Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5c569c448b-qzllc Total loading time: 0.298 Render date: 2022-07-05T13:40:28.775Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Bibliographie ethnographique de l'Afrique sud-Saharienne

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 May 2014

David Newbury*
Affiliation:
Bukavu, Zaire

Extract

Colonially-imposed linguistic boundaries have often represented important obstacles to historical and anthropological research in Africa. Even where researchers working in African vernaculars employ data in a transfrontier context, their publications usually appear in only one European language, and are therefore often not accessible to Africans or western researchers unacquainted with that language. The resultant linguistic fragmentation of Africanist publications sometimes leaves the impression of limited sources on a given topic, whereas in fact the relevant sources may be very rich when the writings of two or more national units--often presenting quite different conceptual approaches as well as languages--are drawn on fully.

Some of the most arresting examples of such myopic behavior are evident along Zaire's eastern border with former British administered areas of eastern Africa. T.O. Ranger's valuable account of the Mwana Lesa Watch Tower movement is a case in point. His discussion of Tomo Nyirenda's activities in northern Zambia is detailed and highly revealing. But the Mwana Lesa Movement was also active in the southern pedicule of Zaire, and there are numerous published works (of varying quality) in French on this fascinating example of colonial repression of African religious initiative. Although his account does draw on works in English which are based on (unspecified) Congo materials, only a single francophone source appears in Ranger's otherwise intriguing synthesis.

Farther north, the long border between Zaire and former British-administered areas provides many other examples of similarly narrow linguistic horizons. Little work, for example, has appeared on the translacustrine ties among people living on the lakeshores of the western rift lakes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © African Studies Association 1982

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1. Ranger, T.O., “The Mwana Lesa Movement of 1925” in Themes in the Christian History of Central Africa, ed. Ranger, T.O. and Weller, J. (London, 1975), 4576.Google Scholar

2. Southall, Aidan, “Belgian and British Administration in Alurland,” Zaire, 8(1954), 467–86Google Scholar; Chrétien, J-P, “Le Buha à la fin du xixe siècle: un peuple, six royaumes,” Etudes d'Histoire Africaine, 7(1975), 938Google Scholar; Evans-Pritchard, E.E., “A History of the Kingdom of Gbudwe” in Evans-Pritchard, E.E., The Azande (Oxford, 1971), 284414.Google Scholar Many of his writings on the Zande draw explicitly and with full appreciation of work by earlier scholars, especially de Calonne on the Zaire side of the border. It is worth noting that during the 1950s there were several joint conferences of the Institut pour la recherche scientifique en Afrique centrale (Congo, Rwanda-Burundi) and the East African Institute of Social Research (Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya).

3. Whereas, for example, Scheven, Yvette in her “Africana in the Indexes,” HA, 4(1977), 207–27Google Scholar, notes a tota l of 460 Africana journals consulted by the fifty-two indexes she analyzed, the Bibliographie ethnographique noted 706 such journals over a five-year period and indexed citations from 428 of them. By contrast Scheven's analysis (which omitted the BE), observed that the International African Bibliograpy, by far the most complete of those she used, is based on reference to 304 journals, without noting the actual number cited.

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Bibliographie ethnographique de l'Afrique sud-Saharienne
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Bibliographie ethnographique de l'Afrique sud-Saharienne
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Bibliographie ethnographique de l'Afrique sud-Saharienne
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *