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Democracy, courts and proportionality analysis in Asia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2020

PO JEN YAP*
Affiliation:
Faculty of Law, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
*Corresponding

Abstract

While proportionality analysis (PA) may have originated from Germany, it has not remained a European product. PA has been locally transplanted across Anglophone nations, found in mixed legal systems that are rooted in the common law and even adapted in parts of Latin America and Asia. This article explains why PA is flourishing in parts of Asia – for example, South Korea and Taiwan – and why it is faltering in other countries, such as Singapore and China, where the absence of PA can be attributed to the non-fulfilment of Kant’s first prerequisite for perpetual peace: a republican government (liberal democracy).

Type
Symposium/Special Issue Manuscript
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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References

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