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The Treatment of Hate Speech in German Constitutional Law (Part II)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 March 2019

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As pointed out by the Federal Constitutional Court, a specific determination of the appropriateness of hate speech prohibitions can be based only on the circumstances of individual cases. Some particularly prominent cases are now reviewed.

Type
Public Law
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by German Law Journal GbR 

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