Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-9z9qw Total loading time: 0.369 Render date: 2021-07-28T21:45:46.436Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Katian (Upper Ordovician) carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in the Neixiang area, central China: implications for intercontinental correlation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 May 2019

Xiuchun Jing
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Geobiology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083, China School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083, China
Svend Stouge
Affiliation:
Natural History Museum of Denmark, Geological Museum, Earth and Planetary System Science Section, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K, Denmark
Yufeng Tian
Affiliation:
School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083, China
Xunlian Wang
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory of Geobiology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083, China School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083, China
Hongrui Zhou
Affiliation:
School of Earth Sciences and Resources, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100083, China
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The Katian (Upper Ordovician) Shiyanhe Formation at the Sigang section, Neixiang area, Henan Province, central China, has been investigated for carbon isotope (δ13Ccarb) chemostratigraphy. The carbon isotopic data document signal between the two major Ordovician positive shifts in δ13C, the early Katian Guttenberg and the Hirnantian excursions. The Kope (Ka1/2), Fairview (Ka2/3), Waynesville (Ka3/4), Whitewater (Ka4) excursions and a doubtful Elkhorn (Ka4) excursion are identified herein. The continuous and well-defined conodont zonal succession of the Sigang section provides a secure biostratigraphic framework for the mid-late Katian carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in China. Correlation between carbon-isotope data curve and the relative sea-level changes shows no clear correspondence, and hence the sea-level change is probably not the main driver of δ13C excursions during the Katian. Intercontinentally, the mid–late Katian carbon isotope excursions, identified mainly in the North American and Baltoscandian successions, are useful for improving long-distance stratigraphic correlations. This further suggests that these excursions represent global perturbations in the carbon cycle.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
© Cambridge University Press 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Ainsaar, L, Kaljo, D, Martma, T, Meidla, T, Mannik, P, Nolvak, J and Tinn, O (2010) Middle and Upper Ordovician carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in Baltoscandia: a correlation standard and clues to environmental history. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 294, 189201.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ainsaar, L, Meidla, T and Martma, T (2004a) The Middle Caradoc Facies and Faunal Turnover in the Late Ordovician Baltoscandian palaeobasin. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 210, 119–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ainsaar, L, Meidla, T and Tinn, O (2004b) Middle and Upper Ordovician stable isotope stratigraphy across the facies belts in the East Baltic. In WOGOGOB 2004, 8th Meeting of the Working Group on Ordovician Geology of Baltoscandia, Conference Materials, Abstracts and Field Guidebook (eds O Hints and L Ainsaar), pp. 1112. Tallinn and Tartu.Google Scholar
Ainsaar, L, Meidla, T, Tinn, O, Martma, T and Dronov, A (2007) Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) carbon isotope stratigraphy in Baltoscandia. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica 46, 18.Google Scholar
Algeo, TJ, Marenco, PJ and Saltzman, MR (2016) Co-evolution of oceans, climate, and the biosphere during the ‘Ordovician Revolution’: a review. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 458, 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Algeo, TJ, Wilkinson, BH and Lohmann, KC (1992) Meteoric-burial diagenesis of Middle Pennsylvanian limestones in the Orogrande Basin, New Mexico: water/rock interactions and basin geothermics. Journal of Sedimentary Petrology 62, 652–70.Google Scholar
Banner, JL and Hanson, GN (1990) Calculation of simultaneous isotopic and trace element variations during water-rock interaction with applications to carbonate diagenesis. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 54, 3123–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barnes, CR (2004) Was there an Ordovician superplume event? In The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (eds Webby, B, Paris, F, Droser, M and Percival, IG), pp. 7780. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Bergström, SM, Agematsu, S and Schmitz, B (2010a) Global Upper Ordovician correlation by means of δ13C chemostratigraphy: implications of the discovery of the Guttenberg δ13C excursion (GICE) in Malaysia. Geological Magazine 147, 641–51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Bruton, DL, Schmitz, B and Terfelt, F (2017) Local and trans-Atlantic chemostratigraphic significance of new δ13Corg data from the Sandbian and Katian Stages (Middle–Upper Ordovician) of the Oslo region, Norway. GFF 139, 289300.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Chen, X, Gutiérrez-Marco, JC and Dronov, A (2009a) The new chronostratigraphic classification of the Ordovician System and its relations to major regional series and stages and to δ 13C chemostratigraphy. Lethaia 42, 97107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Chen, XU, Schmitz, B, Young, S, Rong, JY and Saltzman, MR (2009b) First documentation of the Ordovician Guttenberg δ 13C excursion (GICE) in Asia: chemostratigraphy of the Pagoda and Yanwashan formations in southeastern China. Geological Magazine 146, 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Eriksson, ME, Schmitz, B, Young, SA and Ahlberg, P (2016) Upper Ordovician δ13Corg chemostratigraphy, K-bentonite stratigraphy, and biostratigraphy in southern Scandinavia: a reappraisal. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 454, 175–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Eriksson, ME, Young, SA, Ahlberg, P and Schmitz, B (2014) Hirnantian (latest Ordovician) δ13C chemostratigraphy in southern Sweden and globally: a refined integration with the graptolite and conodont zone successions. GFF 136, 355–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM and Kleffner, MA (2018) Katian (Upper Ordovician) global δ13C chemostratigraphy: implications of the discovery of a complete Elkhorn Excursion in its type area in western Ohio. In 52nd Annual North-Central GSA Section Meeting Abstracts with Programs, Ames, Iowa.Google Scholar
Bergström, SM, Kleffner, M and Schmitz, B (2012) Late Ordovician–Early Silurian δ13C chemostratigraphy in the Upper Mississippi Valley: implications for chronostratigraphy and depositional interpretations. Earth and Environmental Science Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh 102, 159–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Saltzman, MR, Leslie, SA, Ferretti, A and Young, SA (2015) Trans-Atlantic application of the Baltic Middle and Upper Ordovician carbon isotope zonation. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences 64, 812.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Saltzman, MR and Schmitz, B (2006) First record of the Hirnantian (Upper Ordovician) δ13C excursion in the North American Midcontinent and its regional implications. Geological Magazine 143, 657–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Young, S and Schmitz, B (2010b) Katian (Upper Ordovician) δ13C chemostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy in the United States and Baltoscandia: a regional comparison. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 296, 217–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bergström, SM, Young, S, Schmitz, B and Saltzman, MR (2007) Upper Ordovician (Katian) δ13C chemostratigraphy: a trans-Atlantic comparison. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica 46, 37–9.Google Scholar
Berry, WBN (2010) Black shales: an Ordovician perspective. In The Ordovician Earth System (eds Finney, SC and Berry, WBN), pp. 141–7. Geological Society of America, Special Paper no. 466.Google Scholar
Branson, EB and Mehl, MG (1933) Conodont studies. The University of Missouri Studies 8, 1349.Google Scholar
Brenchley, PJ, Carden, GA, Hints, L, Kaljo, D, Marshall, JD, Martma, T, Meidla, T and Nõlvak, J (2003) High-resolution stable isotope stratigraphy of Upper Ordovician sequences: constraints on the timing of bioevents and environmental changes associated with mass extinction and glaciation. GSA Bulletin 115, 89104.2.0.CO;2>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brenchley, PJ, Marshall, JD, Carden, GAF, Robertson, DBR, Long, DGF, Meidla, T, Hints, L and Anderson, TF (1994) Bathymetric and isotopic evidence for a short-lived Late Ordovician glaciation in a greenhouse period. Geology 22, 295–8.2.3.CO;2>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, C, Wang, J, Algeo, TJ, Wang, Z, Tu, S, Wang, G and Yang, J (2017) Negative δ13Ccarb shifts in Upper Ordovician (Hirnantian) Guanyinqiao Bed of South China linked to diagenetic carbon fluxes. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 487, 430–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chen, X, Rong, JY, Fan, JX, Zhan, RB, Mitchell, CE, Harper, DA, Melchin, MJ, Peng, PA, Finney, SC and Wang, XF (2006) The Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the base of the Hirnantian Stage (the uppermost of the Ordovician System). Episodes 29, 183–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooper, RA and Sadler, PM (2012) The Ordovician Period. In The Geologic Time Scale 2012 (eds Gradstein, FM, Ogg, JG, Schmitz, MD and Ogg, GM), pp. 489523. Amsterdam: Elsevier.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dong, YP, Zhang, GW, Neubauer, F, Liu, XM, Genser, J and Hauzenberger, C (2011) Tectonic evolution of the Qinling orogen, China: review and synthesis. Journal of Asian Earth Sciences 41, 213–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Epstein, AG, Epstein, JB and Harris, LD (1977) Conodont color alteration – an index to organic metamorphism. Geological Survey Professional Paper 995, 127.Google Scholar
Fan, JX, Peng, PA and Melchin, MJ (2009) Carbon isotopes and event stratigraphy near the Ordovician–Silurian boundary, Yichang, South China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 276, 160–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fan, R, Bergström, SM, Lu, YZ, Zhang, XL, Zhang, SB, Li, X and Deng, SH (2015) Upper Ordovician carbon isotope chemostratigraphy on the Yangtze Platform, Southwestern China: implications for the correlation of the Guttenberg δ13C excursion (GICE) and paleoceanic change. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 433, 8190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fanton, KC and Holmden, C (2007) Sea-level forcing of carbon isotope excursions in epeiric seas: implications for chemostratigraphy. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences 44, 807–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gill, BC, Lyons, TW and Saltzman, MR (2007) Parallel, high-resolution carbon and sulfur isotope records of the evolving Paleozoic marine sulfur reservoir. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 256, 156–73.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gorjan, P, Kaiho, K, Fike, DA and Chen, X (2012) Carbon- and sulfur-isotope geochemistry of the Hirnantian (Late Ordovician) Wangjiawan (Riverside) section, South China: global correlation and environmental event interpretation. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 337–338, 1422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hu, MY, Qian, Y, Hu, ZG, Wang, YQ and Xiang, J (2010) Carbon isotopic and element geochemical responses of carbonate rocks and Ordovician sequence stratigraphy in Keping area, Tarim Basin. Acta Petrologica et Mineralogica 29, 199205 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Husinec, A and Bergström, SM (2015) Stable carbon-isotope record of shallow-marine evaporative epicratonic basin carbonates, Ordovician Williston Basin, North America. Sedimentology 62, 314–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Immenhauser, A, Kenter, JAM, Ganssen, G, Bahamonde, JR, Van Vliet, A and Saher, MH (2002) Origin and significance of isotope shifts in Pennsylvanian Carbonates (Asturias, NW Spain). Journal of Sedimentary Research 72, 8294.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jiang, MS, Zhu, JQ, Chen, DZ, Zhang, RH and Qiao, GS (2001) Carbon and strontium isotope variations and responses to sea-level fluctuations in the Ordovician of the Tarim Basin. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 44, 816–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jin, JS, Zhan, RB and Wu, RC (2018) Equatorial cold-water tongue in the Late Ordovician. Geology 46, 759–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jing, XC, Stouge, S, Ding, L, Wang, XL and Zhou, HR (2017) Upper Ordovician conodont biostratigraphy and biofacies from the Sigang section, Neixiang, Henan, central China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 480, 1832.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, DS, Creel, RC and Rios, BA (2016) Carbon isotope stratigraphy and correlation of depositional sequences in the Upper Ordovician Ely Springs Dolostone, eastern Great Basin, USA. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 458, 85101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, DS, Creel, RC, Rios, B and Santiago Ramos, DP (2015) Chemostratigraphy of an Ordovician–Silurian carbonate platform: δ13C records below glacioeustatic exposure surfaces. Geology 43, 5962.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaljo, D, Hints, L, Männik, P and Nõlvak, J (2008) The succession of Hirnantian events based on data from Baltica: brachiopods, chitinozoans, conodonts, and carbon isotopes. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences 57, 197218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaljo, D, Hints, L, Martma, T and Nõlvak, J (2017) A multiproxy study of the Puhmu core section (Estonia, Upper Ordovician): consequences for stratigraphy and environmental interpretation. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences 66, 7792.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaljo, D, Hints, L, Martma, T, Nõlvak, J and Oraspõld, A (2004) Late Ordovician carbon isotope trend in Estonia, its significance in stratigraphy and environmental analysis. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 210, 165–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kaljo, D, Martma, T and Saadre, T (2007) Post-Hunnebergian Ordovician carbon isotope trend in Baltoscandia, its environmental implications and some similarities with that of Nevada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 245, 138–55.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leslie, SA, Saltzman, MR, Bergström, SM, Repetski, JE and Seward, AM (2011) Conodont biostratigraphy and stable isotope stratigraphy across the Ordovician Knox/Beekmantown unconformity in the central Appalachians. In Ordovician of the World (eds Gutiérrez-Marco, JC, Rábano, I and García-Bellido, D), pp. 301–8. Madrid: Instituto Geológico y Minero de España.Google Scholar
Liu, BJ and Xu, XS (1994) Atlas of the Lithofacies and Palaeogeography of South China (Sinian-Triassic). Beijing: Science Press, 192 pp. (in Chinese).Google Scholar
Liu, CG, Qi, LX, Liu, YL, Luo, MX, Shao, XM, Luo, P and Zhang, ZL (2016a) Positive carbon isotope excursions: global correlation and genesis in the Middle–Upper Ordovician in the northern Tarim Basin, Northwest China. Petroleum Science 13, 192203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, Y, Li, C, Algeo, TJ, Fan, J and Peng, PA (2016b) Global and regional controls on marine redox changes across the Ordovician–Silurian boundary in South China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 463, 180–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Liu, YH, Wang, JP, Zhang, HQ and Du, FJ (1991) The Cambrian and Ordovician Systems of Henan Province. Beijing: Geological Publishing House, 225 pp. (in Chinese with English summary).Google Scholar
Ma, YS, Chen, HD and Wang, GL (2009) Atlas of Tectonics and Sequence Lithofacies Palaeogeography in South China (Sinian to Cenozoic Eras). Beijing: Science Press, 480 pp. (in Chinese).Google Scholar
Mei, SL (1995) Biostratigraphy and tectonic implications of late Ordovician conodonts from Shiyanhe Formation, Neixiang, Henan. Acta Palaeontologica Sinica 34, 674–87 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Melchin, MJ, Mitchell, CE, Holmden, C and Štorch, P (2013) Environmental changes in the Late Ordovician–early Silurian: review and new insights from black shales and nitrogen isotopes. GSA Bulletin 125, 1635–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mu, EZ, Li, JJ, Ge, MY, Chen, X, Ni, YN and Lin, YK (1981) Late Ordovician palaeogeographic maps of central China and its instructions. Journal of Stratigraphy 5, 165–70 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
Munnecke, A, Zhang, YD, Liu, X and Cheng, JF (2011) Stable carbon isotope stratigraphy in the Ordovician of South China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 307, 1743.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pei, F and Cai, SH (1987) Ordovician Conodonts of Henan Province, China. Wuhan: Wuhan College of Geology Press, 128 pp. (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Rasmussen, CMØ, Ullmann, CV, Jakobsen, KG, Lindskog, A, Hansen, J, Hansen, T, Eriksson, ME, Dronov, A, Frei, R, Korte, C, Nielsen, AT and Harper, DAT (2016) Onset of main Phanerozoic marine radiation sparked by emerging Mid Ordovician icehouse. Scientific Reports 6, 18884.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rong, JY, Zhan, RB, Wang, Y, Huang, B, Tang, P and Luan, XC (2015) New observation on the Ordovician and Silurian rocks in Xichuan (East Qinling), Western Henan, central China. Journal of Stratigraphy 39, 114 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Saltzman, MR, Bergström, SM, Huff, WD and Kolata, DR (2003) Conodont and graptolite biostratigraphy of the Ordovician (early Chatfieldian, middle Caradocian) δ13C excursion in North America and Baltoscandia: implications for the interpretation of the relations between the Millbrig and Kinnekulle K-bentonites. INSUGEO, Serie Correlación Geológica 17, 137–42.Google Scholar
Saltzman, MR and Young, SA (2005) Long-lived glaciation in the Late Ordovician? Isotopic and sequence-stratigraphic evidence from western Laurentia. Geology 33, 109–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Servais, T and Harper, DAT (2018) The Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE): definition, concept and duration. Lethaia 51, 151–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Servais, T, Lehnert, O, Li, J, Mullins, GL, Munnecke, A, NC, A and Vecoli, M (2008) The Ordovician Biodiversification: revolution in the oceanic trophic chain. Lethaia 41, 99109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sweet, WC (1979) Late Ordovician conodonts and biostratigraphy of the western Midcontinent Province. Brigham Young University Geology Studies 26, 4586.Google Scholar
Sweet, WC (1988). The Conodonta: Morphology, Taxonomy, Paleoecology, and Evolutionary history of a long-extinct animal phylum. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 212 pp.Google Scholar
Trotter, JA, Williams, IS, Barnes, CR, Lecuyer, C and Nicoll, RS (2008) Did cooling oceans trigger Ordovician biodiversification? Evidence from conodont thermometry. Science 321, 550–4.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wang, HZ (1985) Atlas of the Palaeogeography of China. Beijing: Cartographic Publishing House, 85 pp. (in Chinese with English summary).Google Scholar
Wang, K, Chatterton, BDE and Wang, Y (1997) An organic carbon isotope record of Late Ordovician to Early Silurian marine sedimentary rocks, Yangtze Sea, South China: implications for CO2 changes during the Hirnantian glaciation. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 132, 147–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, K, Orth, CJ, Attrep, M, Chatterton, BDE, Wang, X and Li, J-J (1993) The great latest Ordovician extinction on the South China Plate: chemostratigraphic studies of the Ordovician-Silurian boundary interval on the Yangtze platform. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 104, 6179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wang, QC, Yan, DT and Li, SJ (2008) Tectonic-environmental model of the lower Silurian high-quality hydrocarbon source rocks from South China. Acta Geologica Sinica 82, 289–97 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Wang, ZH, Qi, YP and Wu, RC (2011) Cambrian and Ordovician Conodonts in China. Hefei: University of Science and Technology of China Press, 388 pp. (in Chinese with English summary).Google Scholar
Wang, ZZ and Yang, JD (1994) Features of the carbon isotope changes in the Early Palaeozoic rocks of the Kalpin area, Xinjiang and their significance. Journal of Stratigraphy 18, 4552 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Yan, DT, Chen, DZ, Wang, QC, Wang, JG and Wang, ZZ (2009) Carbon and sulfur isotopic anomalies across the Ordovician–Silurian boundary on the Yangtze Platform, South China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 274, 32–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yang, SN (1985) The evolution of Qinling intercontinental rift system in Paleozoic. Earth Science 10, 5362 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Young, SA, Saltzman, MR, Ausich, WI, Desrochers, A and Kaljo, D (2010) Did changes in atmospheric CO2 coincide with latest Ordovician glacial–interglacial cycles? Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 296, 376–88.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Young, SA, Saltzman, MR and Bergström, SM (2005) Upper Ordovician (Mohawkian) carbon isotope (δ13C) stratigraphy in eastern and central North America: regional expression of a perturbation of the global carbon cycle. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 222, 5376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Young, SA, Saltzman, MR, Bergström, SM, Leslie, SA and Xu, C (2008) Paired δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg records of Upper Ordovician (Sandbian–Katian) carbonates in North America and China: implications for paleoceanographic change. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 270, 166–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, GW (2015) The Mianlue Tectonic Zone of the Qinling Orogen and China Continental Tectonics. Beijing: Science Press, 501 pp. (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
Zhang, GW, Meng, QR, Zhou, DW and Guo, AL (1996) Orogenesis and dynamics of the Qinling Orogen. Science in China Series D: Earth Sciences 39, 225–34.Google Scholar
Zhang, GW, Zhang, BR, Yuan, XC and Xiao, QH (2001) Qinling Orogenic Belt and continental dynamics. Beijing: Science Press, 855 pp. (in Chinese).Google Scholar
Zhang, TG, Shen, YA, Zhan, RB, Shen, SZ and Chen, X (2009) Large perturbations of the carbon and sulfur cycle associated with the Late Ordovician mass extinction in South China. Geology 37, 299302.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, TG, Trela, W, Jiang, SY, Nielsen, JK and Shen, YA (2011) Major oceanic redox condition change correlated with the rebound of marine animal diversity during the Late Ordovician. Geology 39, 675–78.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhang, YD and Munnecke, A (2016) Ordovician stable carbon isotope stratigraphy in the Tarim Basin, NW China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 458, 154–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zheng, YF, Xiao, WJ and Zhao, GC (2013) Introduction to tectonics of China. Gondwana Research 23, 1189–206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zhu, JF, Yu, BS, Huang, WH, Chu, GZ and Lu, G (2008) Carbon and oxygen isotope features of Late Cambrian-Ordovician in central Tarim Basin. Petroleum Geology and Oilfield Development in Daqing 27, 3942 (in Chinese with English abstract).Google Scholar
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Katian (Upper Ordovician) carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in the Neixiang area, central China: implications for intercontinental correlation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Katian (Upper Ordovician) carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in the Neixiang area, central China: implications for intercontinental correlation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Katian (Upper Ordovician) carbon isotope chemostratigraphy in the Neixiang area, central China: implications for intercontinental correlation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *