Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-klmjj Total loading time: 0.23 Render date: 2021-09-17T17:43:34.051Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Introduction: Advances in Palaeogeography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 January 2019

G. MEINHOLD*
Affiliation:
School of Geography, Geology and the Environment, Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, UK
*Corresponding
Author for correspondence: g.meinhold@keele.ac.uk

Extract

This special issue of Geological Magazine is dedicated to the memory of Dr Alan Gilbert Smith, Fellow of St John's College and Emeritus Reader in Geology at the University of Cambridge, who passed away on 13 August 2017 at the age of 80. I first met Alan at the 5th International Symposium on Eastern Mediterranean Geology in Thessaloniki, Greece, in spring 2004 and later on several occasions when I was working on the Cambridge Arctic Shelf Programme (CASP) in Cambridge. The palaeotectonic evolution of Greece was one of our common interests. Alan was one of the pathfinders in palaeogeographic research in the 20th century. Together with Sir Edward Bullard (1907–1980) and Jim E. Everett, he published the first computational approach in palaeogeography in their famous paper ‘The fit of the continents around the Atlantic’ (Bullard, Everett & Smith, 1965), which shows a very accurate geometrical fit of the circum-Atlantic continents using the early Cambridge University EDSAC 2 computer. Later, in a contribution in Nature entitled ‘The fit of the southern continents’, Smith & Hallam (1970) presented the first computer fit of the contour of the southern continents forming Gondwanaland. Worth mentioning also are his detailed palaeogeographical maps of the entire Earth, down to epoch level (e.g. Smith, Briden & Drewry 1973; Smith, Hurley & Briden 1981) and his work on the first three editions of A Geologic Time Scale (Harland et al.1982, 1990; Gradstein, Ogg & Smith 2005). Alan's great achievements in the Earth sciences have stimulated new ideas and had a huge impact on geological research, including palaeogeography.

Type
Preface
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bullard, E., Everett, J. E. & Smith, A. G. 1965. The fit of the continents around the Atlantic. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series A, Mathematical and Physical Sciences 258, 4151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gradstein, F., Ogg, J. & Smith, A. G. (eds) 2005. A Geologic Time Scale 2004. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 610 pp.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harland, W. B., Armstrong, R. L., Cox, A. V., Craig, L. E., Smith, A. G. & Smith, D. G. 1990. A Geologic Time Scale 1989. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 263 pp.Google Scholar
Harland, W. B., Cox, A. V., Llewellyn, P. G., Pickton, C. A. G., Smith, A. G. & Walters, R. 1982. A Geologic Time Scale. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 131 pp.Google Scholar
Smith, A. G., Briden, J. C. & Drewry, G. E. 1973. Phanerozoic world maps. In Organisms and Continents through Time (ed. Hughes, N. F.), pp. 142. Special Papers in Palaeontology no. 12.Google Scholar
Smith, A. G. & Hallam, A. 1970. The fit of the southern continents. Nature 225, 139–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, A. G., Hurley, A. M. & Briden, J. C. 1981. Phanerozoic Palaeocontinental World Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 102 pp.Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Introduction: Advances in Palaeogeography
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Introduction: Advances in Palaeogeography
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Introduction: Advances in Palaeogeography
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *