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Infection and premature rupture of the membranes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2008

Kyung Seo*
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, Colorado, USA
James A McGregor
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, Colorado, USA
Janice I French
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, Colorado, USA
*
Kyung Seo, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, Colorado, USA.

Premature rupture of the membranes (prom) and preterm birth

Preterm birth remains a paramount problem in health care worldwide. In the USA, approximately 6–10% of births occur preterm.1–3 Gestational age at birth is the most important determinant of an infant's morbidity and mortality. Preterm infants account for approximately 75% of neonatal deaths,3–5 as well as incalculable direct and indirect financial costs and morbidity.6–9

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1990

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