Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-x7pwn Total loading time: 0.297 Render date: 2021-05-15T09:38:38.793Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

DYSMETABOLIC SYNDROME, PLACENTA-MEDIATED DISEASE AND FUTURE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 October 2004

JOEL G RAY
Affiliation:
Obstetrical Medicine Service, Department of Medicine and Inner City Health Research Unit, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto.

Extract

Tara, a 24 year-old woman of Sri Lankan ancestry, was diagnosed with borderline chronic hypertension just 4 months before her first pregnancy. While she experienced a healthy childhood and normal pubertal development, by age 22 years her body mass index (BMI) was 29 kg/m2. The first pregnancy was complicated by chronic hypertension and superimposed preeclampsia (PET), necessitating Caesarian delivery at 33 weeks gestation. In her third pregnancy she was diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (DM), and delivered a 4100 g macrosomic infant boy by Caesarian section. By age 42 years, Tara was started on oral medications for Type 2 DM and hypertriglyceridaemia; 9 years later she suffered a small lacunar stroke, leaving her with moderate left-sided weakness of the arm and leg. Her own mother had experienced “high blood sugars” during pregnancy, was overweight, and died at age 54 years from the complications of high blood pressure.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2004 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

DYSMETABOLIC SYNDROME, PLACENTA-MEDIATED DISEASE AND FUTURE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

DYSMETABOLIC SYNDROME, PLACENTA-MEDIATED DISEASE AND FUTURE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

DYSMETABOLIC SYNDROME, PLACENTA-MEDIATED DISEASE AND FUTURE RISK OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *