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Antihypertensive therapy during pregnancy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2008

Radha S Chari
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, USA.
Steven A Friedman
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, USA.
Baha M Sibai*
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Tennessee, USA.
*
Baha M Sibai, Professor & Chief, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Tennessee, 853 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38163, USA.

Extract

Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Overall, hypertension complicates approximately 10% of pregnancies. The incidence is higher in patients with predisposing factors including nulliparity, multiple gestation, preexisting hypertension or diabetes, a previous pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia-eclampsia, familial history of preeclampsia, hydrops fetalis and rapidly growing hydatidiform moles.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995

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