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A comparison of modelling techniques used to characterise oxygen uptake kinetics during the on-transient of exercise

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 September 2001

Christopher Bell
Affiliation:
The Centre for Activity and Ageing, School of Kinesiology and Department of Physiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
Donald H. Paterson
Affiliation:
The Centre for Activity and Ageing, School of Kinesiology and Department of Physiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
John M. Kowalchuk
Affiliation:
The Centre for Activity and Ageing, School of Kinesiology and Department of Physiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
Javier Padilla
Affiliation:
The Centre for Activity and Ageing, School of Kinesiology and Department of Physiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
David A. Cunningham
Affiliation:
The Centre for Activity and Ageing, School of Kinesiology and Department of Physiology, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
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Abstract

We compared estimates for the phase 2 time constant (τ) of oxygen uptake (V˙O2) during moderate- and heavy-intensity exercise, and the slow component of V˙O2 during heavy-intensity exercise using previously published exponential models. Estimates for τ and the slow component were different (P < 0.05) among models. For moderate-intensity exercise, a two-component exponential model, or a mono-exponential model fitted from 20 s to 3 min were best. For heavy-intensity exercise, a three-component model fitted throughout the entire 6 min bout of exercise, or a two-component model fitted from 20 s were best. When the time delays for the two- and three-component models were equal the best statistical fit was obtained; however, this model produced an inappropriately low ΔV˙O2/ΔWR (WR, work rate) for the projected phase 2 steady state, and the estimate of phase 2 τ was shortened compared with other models. The slow component was quantified as the difference between V˙O2 at end-exercise (6 min) and at 3 min (ΔV˙O2 (6-3 min); 259 ml min-1), and also using the phase 3 amplitude terms (truncated to end-exercise) from exponential fits (409-833 ml min-1). Onset of the slow component was identified by the phase 3 time delay parameter as being of delayed onset ~2 min (vs. arbitrary 3 min). Using this delay ΔV˙O2 (6-2 min) was ~400 ml min-1. Use of valid consistent methods to estimate τ and the slow component in exercise are needed to advance physiological understanding. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.5, 667-676.

Type
Full Length Papers
Copyright
© The Physiological Society 2001

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