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MORPHOGENETIC AND STRUCTURAL CHARACTERISTICS OF GUINEA GRASS PASTURES UNDER ROTATIONAL STOCKING STRATEGIES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 April 2016

ANDERSON DE MOURA ZANINE
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Maranhão, Chapadinha, MA 65500-000, Brazil
DOMICIO NASCIMENTO JÚNIOR
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Viçosa – UFV, Viçosa, MG 36570-900, Brazil
WILTON LADEIRA DA SILVA
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, State University of São Paulo, Jaboticabal, SP 14884-900, Brazil
BRAULIO MAIA DE LANA SOUSA
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Sergipe, São Cristóvão, SE 49100-000, Brazil
DANIELE DE JESUS FERREIRA
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Maranhão, Chapadinha, MA 65500-000, Brazil
MÁRCIA CRISTINA TEIXEIRA DA SILVEIRA
Affiliation:
Brazilian Enterprise for Agricultural Research, Bagé, RS 96401-970, Brazil
HERIQUE NUNES PARENTE
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Maranhão, Chapadinha, MA 65500-000, Brazil
MANOEL EDUARDO ROZALINO SANTOS
Affiliation:
Department of Animal Science, Federal University of Uberlândia, Uberlandia, MG 38408-100, Brazil
Corresponding

Summary

The objective of this study was to evaluate morphogenetic and structural characteristics of Guinea grass pastures subjected to two grazing frequencies (90 and 95% light interception) and two post-grazing heights (30 and 50 cm), during the rainy season and dry year. The leaf appearance rate varied only in the summer, the grazing pastures managed at 90/50 (light interception/post-grazing height) presented higher values in the leaf appearance rate (0.440 leaf/tiller.day), compared with those managed at 90/30 (0.275 leaf/tiller.day) and 95/50 (0.228 leaf/tiller.day), respectively. In the winter/beginning of the spring, pastures managed at 90/30 (0.03 cm/tiller.day) presented lower stem elongation rate in comparison with those managed at 90/50 (0.19 cm/tiller.day) and 95/30 (0.16 cm/tiller.day). Management strategies do not compromise the tissue flow in tillers and, consequently, can be utilized for the management of Guinea grass.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2016 

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References

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