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GENOTYPIC DIFFERENCES IN CARDINAL TEMPERATURES FOR IN VITRO POLLEN GERMINATION AND POLLEN TUBE GROWTH OF COCONUT HYBRIDS

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 July 2017

C. S. RANASINGHE
Affiliation:
Plant Physiology Division, Coconut Research Institute, Lunuwila 61150, Sri Lanka
M. D. P. KUMARATHUNGE
Affiliation:
Plant Physiology Division, Coconut Research Institute, Lunuwila 61150, Sri Lanka
K. G. S. KIRIWANDENIYA
Affiliation:
Plant Physiology Division, Coconut Research Institute, Lunuwila 61150, Sri Lanka
Corresponding

Summary

Successful fruit set in coconut depends on several reproductive processes including pollen germination and pollen tube growth. High temperature (˃33 °C) during flowering reduces fruit set in coconut. Therefore, identification and development of coconut varieties or hybrids with high reproductive heat tolerance will benefit the coconut industry in view of the climate changes. This experiment was conducted to quantify the response of pollen germination and pollen tube growth of seven coconut hybrids to increasing temperature from 16 to 38 °C. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was carried out to classify coconut hybrids on the basis of their temperature tolerances to pollen germination. Pollen germination and pollen tube length of the hybrids ranged from 56 to 78% and 242 to 772 µm, respectively. A modified bilinear model best described the response to temperature of pollen germination and pollen tube length. Cardinal temperatures (Tmin, Topt and Tmax) of pollen germination and pollen tube length varied among the seven hybrids. PCA identified Tmax for pollen germination and Topt for pollen tube length as the most important parameters in describing varietal tolerance to high temperature. PCA also identified SLGD × Sri Lanka Tall and Sri Lanka Brown Dwarf × Sri Lanka Tall as the most tolerant hybrids to high temperature stress and Sri Lanka Tall × Sri Lanka Tall and Sri Lanka Green Dwarf × San Ramon as less tolerant ones based on cardinal temperatures for pollen germination and pollen tube length. Tmax for pollen germination of the most tolerant and less tolerant hybrids were 41.9 and 39.5 °C, respectively. Topt for pollen tube length in the most tolerant and less tolerant hybrids were 29.5 and 26.0 °C, respectively.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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GENOTYPIC DIFFERENCES IN CARDINAL TEMPERATURES FOR IN VITRO POLLEN GERMINATION AND POLLEN TUBE GROWTH OF COCONUT HYBRIDS
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GENOTYPIC DIFFERENCES IN CARDINAL TEMPERATURES FOR IN VITRO POLLEN GERMINATION AND POLLEN TUBE GROWTH OF COCONUT HYBRIDS
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