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EVALUATION OF CASSAVA VARIETIES FOR WEED TOLERANCE ABILITY

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2017

IRIÉ R. DJE BI
Affiliation:
Unité de Phytotechnie et Amélioration Génétique (UPAG), Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR des Sciences de la Nature, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d'Ivoire
KOUADIO I. KOUASSI
Affiliation:
Unité de Phytotechnie et Amélioration Génétique (UPAG), Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR des Sciences de la Nature, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d'Ivoire
KOUAMÉ K. KOFFI
Affiliation:
Unité de Phytotechnie et Amélioration Génétique (UPAG), Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR des Sciences de la Nature, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d'Ivoire
KOUAKOU L. KOUAKOU
Affiliation:
Unité de Phytotechnie et Amélioration Génétique (UPAG), Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR des Sciences de la Nature, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d'Ivoire
JEAN-PIERRE BAUDOIN
Affiliation:
Unité de Phytotechnie Tropicale et d'Horticulture, Université de Liège – Gembloux Agro. Bio. Tech. Passage des Déportés, 2. B-5030 Gembloux, Belgique
BI IRIÉ A. ZORO
Affiliation:
Unité de Phytotechnie et Amélioration Génétique (UPAG), Université Nangui Abrogoua, UFR des Sciences de la Nature, 02 BP 801 Abidjan 02, Côte d'Ivoire
Corresponding

Summary

Many types of weeds occur in cassava fields causing enormous yield losses due to competition for nutrients, light and space. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the growth and yield of four traditional varieties of cassava (Bonoua Blanc, Tambou, Yassé and Six mois) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and select the highest tolerant variety to weed competition. Six treatments were induced by varying the period in which cassava varieties were grown with weeds. Varieties and exposure time to competition with weeds significantly affected the productivity of cassava. The number of leaves per plant (NLP), the number of tuberous roots per plant (NTRP) and the weight of tuberous roots per plant (WTRP) declined with increasing duration of weed presence. After an initial period of weeding, the first four months of grassing proved critical for the four varieties. Despite the presence of weeds, Bonoua Blanc has higher growth and yield than Tambou, Yasse and Six mois. This suggests that Bonoua Blanc was more tolerant to weed competition than the others from planting to harvest, being a suitable variety in intercropping systems.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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