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The unnoticed interictal disphoric disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

S. Ramos-Perdigues
Affiliation:
Psychiatry Unit, Can Misses Hospital, Psychiatry, Ibiza, Spain
E. Bailés
Affiliation:
Univeristy Pompeu Fabra, Psychology, Barcelona, Spain
A. Mané
Affiliation:
Institute of Neuropsychiatry and Addictions, Psychiatry, Barcelona, Spain
L. Pintor
Affiliation:
Epilepsy Unit, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Psychiatry, Barcelona, Spain

Abstract

Introduction

Psychiatric morbidity in refractory epilepsy is frequent and has a negative influence on quality of life. Treatment-refractory epileptic patients are at higher risk of developing psychiatric disturbances. The interictal dysphoric disorder (IDD) has been described as a pleomorphic pattern of symptoms claimed to be typical of patients with epilepsy. It is characterized by 3/8 symptoms: depressive mood, anergia, pain, insomnia, fear, anxiety, irritability, and euphoric mood.

Objectives

To provide evidence that psychiatric morbidity is high in refractory epilepsy and to describe associations to IDD.

Aims

The present study aims to show that there are typical psychiatric conditions in epilepsy that can be unnoticed.

Methods

We cross-sectional analyzed the psychopathologic outcomes of patients with refractory epilepsy. The assessments methods included SCID for DSM-IV and clinical interview for epileptic specific psychiatric conditions.

Results

The sample consists of 153 patients, with a mean age of 37. A total of 42.5% were males. One or more Axis I diagnoses was seen in 38% of the patients. The most common condition was IDD (27.1%), followed by affective and anxiety disorders (22 and 15.3% respectively). Considering patients with IDD, we found differences in locus (P = 0.001) (present in 34.3% of non-stablished locus, 8.6% of extra-temporal locus and 57.1% of temporal locus) but not with hemisphere, sex, type of crises, treatment. We neither found correlation with age, number of crisis or number of treatments.

Conclusions

Psychiatric comorbidities as IDD do not appear in the DSM-IV but are prevalent and could be related with temporal locus.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
e-Poster viewing: Consultation liaison psychiatry and psychosomatics
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2017
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