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Descriptive analysis of the activity performed at a “Depot Clinic”

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

J. Correas-Lauffer*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon Y Cajal Universitary Hospital, Madrid, Spain

Abstract

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Introduction

Depot Clinic is a relevant tool in the management of chronic psychotic patients in the ambulatory setting, since it allows monitoring attendance to consultation, compliance, and facilitates patient's follow-up.

The aim of this study is to improve knowledge about the Depot Clinic at our Center, checking adherence and retention rates to the treatments.

Methodology

Retrospective review of medical records of all patients that have attended our Center to receive long-acting medication in the last 36 months. Sociodemographic, clinical and treatment data were recorded, as well as information about hospitalizations, compliance with visits, need of additional medication (oral antipsychotics or corrective medication), etc.

Results

Ninety-six patients were included in the analysis. Mean age was 44.8 y and mean time since diagnosis was 17.34 y. Sixty-seven of them were diagnosed with schizophrenia. 55% of patients received risperidone (RLAI), 27% fluphenazine decanoate and 17.7% zuclopentixol. Patients receiving RLAI had been under that treatment for 2.6 y.,; those with zuclopentixol and fluhenazine treatments had been receiving them for 6.81 and 11.54 y., respectively. Half of patients treated with RLAI and two thirds of those receiving fluphenazine had oral antipsychotics prescribed as well. Corrective treatment was used in 24%, 64% and 80% of patients receiving RLAI, zuclopentixol and fluphenazine, respectively. Among those patients treated with RLAI, retention rate was 66%, while 9% of patients decided to withdraw the treatment themselves.

Conclusion

RLAI is the most frequently used antipsychotic in our Depot Clinic. This drug has a retention rate over 60% after a 3-year follow-up.

Type
Poster Session 1: Schizophrenia and Other Psychosis
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2007
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