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Training of affect recognition (TAR) and its neurophysiological correlates in schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

S. Stroth
Affiliation:
Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University, LVR-Klinikum Duesseldorf, Germany
N. Frommann
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf, Germany
F. Lüneborg
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Heinrich-Heine-University, LVR-Klinikum Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
N. Kampka
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Heinrich-Heine-University, LVR-Klinikum Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
J. Brinkmeyer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Heinrich-Heine-University, LVR-Klinikum Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
C. Luckhaus
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Heinrich-Heine-University, LVR-Klinikum Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
W. Wölwer
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Heinrich-Heine-University, LVR-Klinikum Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf, Germany
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Abstract

Background

Schizophrenia patients exhibit impairments in facial affect recognition associated with neurophysiological abnormalities. Using the Training of Affect Recognition (TAR) developed by our group behavioural performance in facial affect recognition improved significantly in schizophrenia patients [1]. Purpose of the presented work was to identify the underlying mechanisms and associated generators of neuroelectric activity.

Methods

In a randomized controlled (waiting group) design 19 schizophrenia patients received TAR. Concomitant to facial affect recognition performance, ERPs were recorded and analyzed with respect to underlying generators of cortical activity using low resolution brain electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) software.

Results

Schizophrenia patients showed noticeable deviations in neuroelectric correlates of emotion recognition associated with poorer performance in the administered task. As a result of TAR treatment no significant changes in event related potentials were found. However, LORETA results showed a significant increase of activity within relevant brain areas, specific for the processing stages associated with facial emotion recognition (N170 and P240).

Conclusions

EEG findings of the present study indicate that neurophysiologic abnormalities corresponding with poorer performance in schizophrenia patients can be attenuated by training.

Type
P02-199
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2011

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References

Wölwer, W.Frommann, N.Halfmann, S.Piaszek, A.Streit, M., and Gaebel, W., Remediation of impairments in facial affect recognition in schizophrenia: efficacy and specificity of a new training program. Schizophr Res 2005. 146(2–3): p.295–303.10.1016/j.schres.2005.07.018CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Streit, M.Wölwer, W.Brinkmeyer, J.Ihl, R.,and Gaebel, W.EEG-correlates of facial affect recognition and categorisation of blurred faces in schizophrenic patients and healthy volunteers. Schizophr Res 2001;49(1–2): p.145–55.10.1016/S0920-9964(00)00041-4CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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