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Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Anorexia Nervosa: a Pilot Study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2011

F. Van den Eynde
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Section of Eating Disorders, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, United Kingdom
S. Guillaume
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Section of Eating Disorders, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, United Kingdom CHU de Montpellier, Université Montpellier I, Inserm U1061, Montpellier34006, France
H. Broadbent
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Section of Eating Disorders, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, United Kingdom
I.C. Campbell
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Section of Eating Disorders, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, United Kingdom
U. Schmidt
Affiliation:
King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Section of Eating Disorders, De Crespigny Park, London, SE5 8AF, United Kingdom
Corresponding
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Abstract

The search for new treatments to improve outcome in people with anorexia nervosa continues. This pilot study investigated whether one session of high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex reduces eating disorder related symptoms following exposure to visual and real food stimuli. Safety and tolerability were also assessed. Ten right-handed people with anorexia nervosa underwent one session of rTMS. Subjective experiences related to the eating disorder (e.g. urge to restrict, feeling full etc.) were assessed before and after rTMS. Non-parametric repeated measures tests were used. rTMS was safe and well-tolerated, and resulted in reduced levels of feeling full, feeling fat and feeling anxious. Thus, rTMS may reduce core symptoms of anorexia nervosa. Future research should establish the therapeutic potential of rTMS in anorexia nervosa.

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Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier Masson SAS 2013

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Footnotes

1

FVDE and SG have equally contributed to the manuscript.

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