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P0193 - Amygdala-Orbitofrontal connectivity and 5-HTT genotype effects in healthy controls and patients with major depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

E. Friedel
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
F. Schlagenhauf
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
S.Y. Park
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
T. Kahnt
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
J. Wrase
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
A. Stroehle
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
A. Heinz
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medical Center Berlin (CCM), Berlin, Germany
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Abstract

Amygdala functions and reactivity have been identified to play a major role in mood disorders and anxiety. A polymorphism of the human serotonin transporter gene (SCL6A4) has been associated with serotonin transporter expression and with processing of aversive stimuli in the amygdala. There is converging evidence that SCL6A4 genotype accounts for about 30% of the total variance in amygdala response during the presentation of aversive but not affectively positive visual stimuli, which were equally salient. S-allele carriers also showed stronger prefrontal-amygdala connectivity. This suggests that increased amygdala responses in s-allele carriers are related to altered serotonergic modulation of prefrontal afferents within the amygdala. In patients with major depression amygdala activation to aversive stimuli and prefrontal connectivity may be dysfunctional. This hypothesis was tested in 20 patients with major depression and 20 age-matched healthy controls.

Results will be discussed with respect to genotype effects on limbic activation and connectivity.

Type
Poster Session II: Depression
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2008

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P0193 - Amygdala-Orbitofrontal connectivity and 5-HTT genotype effects in healthy controls and patients with major depression
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