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P0141 - Cognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia and their correlation with anxiety

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

K. Jeczminska
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
A. Kozmin
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
A. Krawiec
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
J. Jarnot
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
J. Dusik
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
A. Piwowarczyk
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
K. Krysta
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
M. Janas-Kozik
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
I. Krupka-Matuszczyk
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland
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Abstract

Background:

Cognitive deficits and anxiety are common symptoms in patients suffering from schizophrenia.

Aims:

The aim of the research was to find a relationship between selected cognitive functions and intensity of anxiety as state and trait in people suffering from schizophrenia.

Method:

18 patients (9 women and 9 men) with a diagnose of paranoidal schizophrenia (according to ICD-10) were recruited to the study. The battery of cognitive neuropsychological tests used to assess cognitive functions included: trail making tests, part A and B, and Stroop test, part RCNb and NCWd. The intensity of anxiety as state and trait was assessed by means of the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI).

Results:

In the examined group statistically significant relation was found between the results of trail making test, part A and B (measuring psychomotor speed and visual spatial working memory), as well as part RCNb of the Stroop test (measuring reading speed), and the intensity of anxiety as state measured with STAI. Another statistically significant correlation was found between results of trail making test, part A (measuring psychomotor speed) and anxiety as trait measured with STAI. No other significant correlations between results of the applied cognitive tests and anxiety as state and trait were found.

Conclusions:

The above correlations between cognitive tests results and intensity of anxiety indicate that there must be a modulating impact of emotions on some of measured cognitive functions. The awareness of these correlations may be important in the process of constructing rehabilitation programmes for patients.

Type
Poster Session I: Schizophrenia and Psychosis
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2008

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