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Impact of pain and remission in the functioning of patients with depression in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

D. Novick*
Affiliation:
Eli Lilly and Company, Windlesham, Surrey, UK
Q. Shi
Affiliation:
Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutica Company, Ltd., Shanghai, China
L. Yue
Affiliation:
Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutica Company, Ltd., Shanghai, China
W. Montgomery
Affiliation:
Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, Australia
M.V. Moneta
Affiliation:
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
S. Siddi
Affiliation:
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Section of Clinical Psychology, Department of Education, Psychology, Philosophy, University of Cagliari, Italy
J.M. Haro
Affiliation:
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Fundació Sant Joan de Déu, CIBERSAM, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
*
*Corresponding author.
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Abstract

Introduction

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the second leading cause of disability in China.

Objective

To analyze functioning during the course of treating MDD in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong.

Aims

To study the influence of pain and clinical remission on functioning.

Methods

This was a post-hoc analysis of a 6-month, prospective, observational study (n = 909) with 422 patients enrolled from China (n = 205; 48.6%), Taiwan (n = 199; 47.2%) and Hong Kong (n = 18; 4.2%). Functioning was measured with the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), pain with the Somatic Symptom Inventory, and severity of depression with the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report 16 (QIDS). Patients were classified as having no pain, persistent pain (pain at any visit) or remitted pain (pain only at baseline). A mixed model with repeated measures was fitted to analyze the relationship between pain and functioning.

Results

At baseline, 40% of the patients had painful physical symptoms. Patients with pain had a higher QIDS and lower SDS (P < 0.05) at baseline. At 6 months, patients with persistent pain had lower functioning (P < 0.05). The regression model confirmed that clinical remission was associated with higher functioning at endpoint and that patients with persistent pain had lower functioning at endpoint when compared with the no pain group.

Conclusions

Patients presenting with pain symptoms had lower functioning at baseline. At 6 months, pain persistence was associated with significantly lower functioning as measured by the SDS. Clinical remission was associated with better functional outcomes. The course of pain was related to the likelihood of achieving remission.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
EV528
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2016

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