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Further evidence of the multi-dimensionality of hallucinatory predisposition: factor structure of a modified version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale in a normal sample

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

Frank Larøi*
Affiliation:
Service de Neuropsychologie, Université de Liège, Boulevard du Rectorat (B33), Sart-Tilman, 4000Liège, Belgium
Philippe Marczewski
Affiliation:
Service de Neuropsychologie, Université de Liège, Boulevard du Rectorat (B33), Sart-Tilman, 4000Liège, Belgium
Martial Van der Linden
Affiliation:
Service de Neuropsychologie, Université de Liège, Boulevard du Rectorat (B33), Sart-Tilman, 4000Liège, Belgium
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail address:flaroi@ulg.ac.be (F. Larøi).
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Abstract

Recent years has seen an increasing interest in the hallucinatory experience, including investigations of its phenomenological prevalence and character both in pathological and normal (predisposed) populations. We investigated the multi-dimensionality of hallucinatory experiences in 265 subjects from the normal population, who completed a modified version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale. Principal components analysis was performed on the data. Four factors were obtained loading on items reflecting (1) sleep-related hallucinatory experiences (2) vivid daydreams (3) intrusive thoughts or realness of thought and (4) auditory hallucinations. The results offer further evidence of the multi-dimensionality of hallucinatory disposition in the normal population. Directions for future research in hallucinatory predisposition are discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 European Psychiatric Association

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Further evidence of the multi-dimensionality of hallucinatory predisposition: factor structure of a modified version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale in a normal sample
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Further evidence of the multi-dimensionality of hallucinatory predisposition: factor structure of a modified version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale in a normal sample
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Further evidence of the multi-dimensionality of hallucinatory predisposition: factor structure of a modified version of the Launay-Slade Hallucinations Scale in a normal sample
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