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Fatty acid composition of the postmortem corpus callosum of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

K. Hamazaki
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Molecular Psychiatry, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama351-0198, Japan Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toyama, Toyama City, Toyama9300194, Japan
M. Maekawa
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Molecular Psychiatry, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama351-0198, Japan
T. Toyota
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Molecular Psychiatry, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama351-0198, Japan
B. Dean
Affiliation:
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, VictoriaAustralia
T. Hamazaki
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Molecular Psychiatry, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama351-0198, Japan
T. Yoshikawa
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Molecular Psychiatry, RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Saitama351-0198, Japan
Corresponding
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Abstract

Background

Studies investigating the relationship between n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) levels and psychiatric disorders have thus far focused mainly on analyzing gray matter, rather than white matter, in the postmortem brain. In this study, we investigated whether PUFA levels showed abnormalities in the corpus callosum, the largest area of white matter, in the postmortem brain tissue of patients with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder.

Methods

Fatty acids in the phospholipids of the postmortem corpus callosum were evaluated by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. Specimens were evaluated for patients with schizophrenia (n = 15), bipolar disorder (n = 15), or major depressive disorder (n = 15) and compared with unaffected controls (n = 15).

Results

In contrast to some previous studies, no significant differences were found in the levels of PUFAs or other fatty acids in the corpus callosum between patients and controls. A subanalysis by sex gave the same results. No significant differences were found in any PUFAs between suicide completers and non-suicide cases regardless of psychiatric disorder diagnosis.

Conclusions

Patients with psychiatric disorders did not exhibit n-3 PUFAs deficits in the postmortem corpus callosum relative to the unaffected controls, and the corpus callosum might not be involved in abnormalities of PUFA metabolism. This area of research is still at an early stage and requires further investigation.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier Masson SAS 2017

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Footnotes

Abbreviations: AA, arachidonic acid; CVD, cardiovascular disease; DHA, docosahexaenoic acid; PMI, postmortem interval; PUFAs, polyunsaturated fatty acids.

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