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EPA-1705 – Perinatal Depression and Depressive Symptoms in Portuguese and Immigrant Women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 April 2020

M.J. Soares
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
N. Madeira
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
C. Roque
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
A.T. Pereira
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
M. Marques
Affiliation:
Miguel Torga Higher Institute, Miguel Torga Higher Institute, Coimbra, Portugal
S. Bos
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
B. Maia
Affiliation:
High Institute of Social Service, High Institute of Social Service, Porto, Portugal
A.P. Amaral
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
J. Valente
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
V. Nogueira
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
A. Macedo
Affiliation:
Psychological Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal
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Abstract

Introduction

Immigration involves significant changes in the psychosocial context, due to losses, relationship breakdowns, lack of social support, not feeling at home, novelty, discrimination, resettlement demands (occupation, language). These life stressors might lead to psychological distress, including depression.

Objectives/Aims

To explore if there are differences in the prevalence of depression and depressive symptoms in immigrant and Portuguese women during the perinatal period.

Methods

The sample comprises 397 women. 348 (87.7%) of them were Portuguese and the remaining 49 (12.4%) were born in other Countries (5.8% Other/European, 3.8% African, 2.8% South America). They were both interviewed at the last trimester of pregnancy (T0) and at 3 months postpartum (T1), using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, which allows CID-10 and DSM-IV diagnoses of depression. Both at T0 and T1, they also completed the Postpartum Depression Screening Scale (PDSS) to evaluate depressive symptoms.

Results

Immigrants compared with Portuguese women did not differ in respect to a CID-10/DSM-IV depression diagnosis and in respect to PDSS total scores at T0 and T1. Being immigrant is associated with higher levels of passive suicidal ideation (death seem the only way out of this nightmare) (rs=.116, p<.05), feelings of loneliness (rs=.118, p<.05) and being overwhelmed by anguished (rs=.134, p<.01) at pregnancy and with feelings of being inadequate as a mother (rs=.128, p<.05) at the postpartum.

Conclusions

Being immigrant might contribute to higher levels of depressive symptoms during the perinatal period, including suicidal ideation. These findings have clinical implications, while working with immigrants.

Type
P37 - Women, Gender and Mental Health
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2014

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