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The diagnostic stability of ICD-10 psychiatric diagnoses in clinical practice

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

TK Daradkeh
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, UAE University, PO Box 17666Al Ain, United Arab Emirates
OEF El-Rufaie
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, UAE University, PO Box 17666Al Ain, United Arab Emirates
YO Younis
Affiliation:
Al Ain Hospital, Ministry of Health, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates
R Ghubash
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Sciences, UAE University, PO Box 17666Al Ain, United Arab Emirates
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Summary

This study examines the stability of ICD-10 diagnoses of patients admitted to Al Ain (United Arab Emirates) inpatients psychiatric unit during the period from November 1993 to August 1995. Diagnostic stability is a measure of the degree to which diagnoses remained unchanged at a later hospital admission. One hundred and seven patients were admitted more than once during this period, accounting for 168 readmissions. High levels of diagnostic stability were found for ICD-10 Fl-psychiatric disorders (100%), F2-schizophrenia (87%), F3-bipolar disorders (87%) and F3-depressive disorders (73%). A poor level of stability was found for patients with neurotic, stress related and adjustment disorders (F4), ranging from zero for somatoform disorders to 50% for generalized anxiety and panic disorders. Poor levels of stability were also found for other psychoses (excluding schizophrenia and affective psychoses) and personality disorders. We conclude that the introduction of ICD-10 as a formal diagnostic system has greatly improved the temporal stability of the most commonly encountered psychiatric disorders (ICD-10 Fl to F3 disorders), confirming the construct validity of those psychiatric disorders. Further investigations are required to evaluate the diagnostic stability of neurotic and other psychotic disorders.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier, Paris 1997

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