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Cortisol-binding globulin levels in bipolar disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

E Vieta
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036Barcelona, Spain
C Gastó
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036Barcelona, Spain
MJ Martínez de Osaba
Affiliation:
Hormonal Laboratory, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036Barcelona
A Otero
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036Barcelona, Spain
E Nieto
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de Manresa, Manresa
L Pintor
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036Barcelona, Spain
J Blanch
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036Barcelona, Spain
J Vallejo
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de Bellvitge, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
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Summary

Cortisol-binding globulin (CBG) is an alpha-1-glycoprotein with high affinity for cortiso that could be a potential biological marker of chronic stress, according to several previous studies. In order to examine CBG concentrations in bipolar disorder, we determined serum CBG levels by radioimmunoassay with monoclonal antibodies in a sample of 39 RDC bipolar I patients in remission and 21 healthy age-, sex- and weight-matched control subjects. Only lithium treatment was permitted. Plasma cortisol and serum lithium levels were also determined. Bipolar males showed statistically significant lower serum CBG levels than controls, whereas women showed very similar values. No correlation was found between CBG levels and cortisol or lithium concentrations. It is concluded that CBG levels are affected by chronic affective illness, even during remission periods, at least in bipolar males.

Type
Original article
Copyright
Copyright © Elsevier, Paris 1997

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