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Capgras-delusion in a female patient with schizophrenia: A case report and study of the literature

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 March 2020

P. Kolarov*
Affiliation:
Medical University, Pleven, Bulgaria, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Pleven, Bulgaria
P. Chumpalova
Affiliation:
Medical University, Pleven, Bulgaria, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Pleven, Bulgaria
G. Georgiev
Affiliation:
Medical University, Pleven, Bulgaria, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Pleven, Bulgaria
A. Todorov
Affiliation:
University Hospital, Pleven, Bulgaria, Psychiatry Clinic, Pleven, Bulgaria
M. Stoimenova
Affiliation:
Medical University, Pleven, Bulgaria, Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Pleven, Bulgaria
*Corresponding
* Corresponding author.
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Abstract

Background

The Capgras syndrome is a rarely observed condition in patients with different psychiatric diseases, which is characterized with delusional misidentification of people, places, objects, etc.

Objective

In this case report we aim to describe the clinical characteristics and manifestation of Capgras syndrome in a female patient with schizophrenia, perform a literature search on the topic and compare our report to literature findings.

Results and discussion

A 50-year-old female patient was verbally and physically aggressive to her family members upon admission to our center. The onset of disease was marked 2 years ago when she first started feeling deserted and isolated and had a prescribed therapy for her condition which she did not follow. During the current admission a psychiatric assessment was performed. Delusional misidentification of her family members was observed and consequent food and sleep self-deprivation due to psychosis was noted. The patient denied being suicidal but was intense and psychotic, and reported different objects to have started disappearing mysteriously from her home. The patient was diagnosed with schizophrenia and was treated with haloperidol, olanzapine, chlorpromazine, and biperiden. The patient was discharged in an improved condition, without episodes of obsessive delusions and improved communication with her relatives.

Conclusion

Although according to the literature organic substrate may be found in some patients with Capgras syndrome, in the case presented here it is the dominant psychotic theme, which determined the content of the disease.

Disclosure of interest

The authors have not supplied their declaration of competing interest.

Type
EV1163
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2016

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