Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-mpvvr Total loading time: 0.175 Render date: 2021-08-03T19:59:38.159Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Blood polyamine levels in drug-free schizophrenics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 April 2020

C. Riaza Bermudo-Soriano
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
C. Vaquero-Lorenzo
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Autonoma University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
M. Dîaz-Hernândez
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Autonoma University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
M. Garda Dorado
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
P. Sânchez-Pâez
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
I. Durân Cristobal
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
R. Manzanero Estopinân
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
J. Gômez-Arnau
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
E. Baca-Garcîa
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Fundaciôn Jimenez Dîaz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA
J. Pérez Piqueras
Affiliation:
Department of Biology, Autonoma University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain
J. Sâiz Ruiz
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
A. Chinchilla Moreno
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Ramon y Cajal Hospital, University of Alcalâ de Henares, Madrid, Spain
Get access

Abstract

Background

Natural polyamines (putrescine, spermidine and spermine) are low molecular weight highly protonated aliphatic molecules that physiologically modulate NMDA, AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors and limbic dopaminergic neurotransmission. Previous studies had demonstrated that polyamine metabolism might be disrupted in schizophrenia, what could potentially be linked to glutamatergic dysfunction. In particular, polyamine levels in blood and fibroblast cultures from patients with schizophrenia had previously been found to be higher than in healthy controls. Indeed, a significant positive correlation between blood polyamine levels and severity of illness may exist.

Methods

In order to test potential differences in blood polyamine levels between drug-free schizophrenia in-patients (n = 12), and healthy controls (n = 26, blood donors), spermidine (spd), spermine (spm), and spermidine/spermine index (spd/spm) were determined using HPLC after dansylation.

Results

No significant differences were found between groups (t = 0,974; df = 36; P = 0,337 for spd, t = l0, 52; df = 36; P = 0,959 for Spm, and, t = 0, 662; df = 36; P = 0,512 for spd/spm).

Conclusions

Though we couldn’t replicate previous findings suggesting disturbances in blood polyamine levels in schizophrenia, this issue may be a promising target. Future research should take into account possible factors such as sex, nutritional state, and stress.

Type
P03-322
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
Submit a response

Comments

No Comments have been published for this article.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Blood polyamine levels in drug-free schizophrenics
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Blood polyamine levels in drug-free schizophrenics
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Blood polyamine levels in drug-free schizophrenics
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *