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The implementation of an anesthesia information management system

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2006

A. Eden
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Haifa, Israel
M. Grach
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Haifa, Israel
Z. Goldik
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Haifa, Israel
I. Shnaider
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Haifa, Israel
H. Lazarovici
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Haifa, Israel
O. Barnett-Griness
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Community Medicine and Epidemiology, Haifa, Israel
A. Perel
Affiliation:
Sheba Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Tel-Hashomer, Israel
R. Pizov
Affiliation:
Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center, Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Haifa, Israel
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Abstract

Summary

Background and objective: Anaesthesia information management systems, though still not used widely, will inevitably replace handwritten records and may eventually serve as a core for the development of computerized decision support. We investigated staff expectations and the accuracy of data entry in a recently implemented commercially available anaesthesia information management system. Methods: A structured questionnaire was administered to the staff before and 1 week and 3 months after implementation in order to assess their opinion. The quality of manual data entry, and of automatic data record was evaluated by looking for missing data and the prevalence of artefacts. Results: Despite initial fears the users quickly accepted the system. Both automatic and manual data entry were found to be accurate and reliable while the prevalence of artefacts was relatively low. Conclusions: A commercially available anaesthesia information management system can be easily implemented and used instead of paper charts.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
2006 European Society of Anaesthesiology

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