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Comparison of a new composite index based on midlatency auditory evoked potentials and electroencephalographic parameters with bispectral index (BIS) during moderate propofol sedation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 July 2006

D. Hadzidiakos
Affiliation:
Charité – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum and Campus Charité Mitte, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany
S. Petersen
Affiliation:
Charité – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum and Campus Charité Mitte, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany
J. Baars
Affiliation:
Charité – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum and Campus Charité Mitte, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany
K. Herold
Affiliation:
Charité – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum and Campus Charité Mitte, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany
B. Rehberg
Affiliation:
Charité – Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum and Campus Charité Mitte, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Berlin, Germany
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Abstract

Summary

Background and objective: Derived parameters of the electroencephalogram and auditory evoked potentials can be used to determine depth of anaesthesia and sedation. However, it is not known whether any parameter can identify the occurrence of awareness in individual patients. We have compared the performance of bispectral index and a new composite index derived from auditory evoked potentials and the electroencephalogram (AAI 1.61) in predicting consciousness, explicit and implicit memory during moderate sedation with propofol. Methods: Twenty-one patients with spinal anaesthesia received intraoperatively propofol at the age-corrected C50 for loss of consciousness and were presented test words via headphones. Bispectral index and AAI 1.61 (auditory evoked potentials, AEP-Monitor2) were recorded in parallel as well as the Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation-score. Postoperatively, testing for explicit and implicit memory formation was performed. Results: Bispectral index and AAI 1.61 correlated well with loss of consciousness defined by an Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation-score of 2 (identical PK of 0.87), but did not allow a prediction of postoperative explicit or implicit recall. Conclusions: Both bispectral index and AAI may be indices of depth of sedation rather than indicators of memory formation, which persists during propofol sedation even after loss of consciousness.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
2006 European Society of Anaesthesiology

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Comparison of a new composite index based on midlatency auditory evoked potentials and electroencephalographic parameters with bispectral index (BIS) during moderate propofol sedation
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Comparison of a new composite index based on midlatency auditory evoked potentials and electroencephalographic parameters with bispectral index (BIS) during moderate propofol sedation
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Comparison of a new composite index based on midlatency auditory evoked potentials and electroencephalographic parameters with bispectral index (BIS) during moderate propofol sedation
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