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Rethinking EU Scholarship

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 October 2005

Jiri Zemanek
Affiliation:
Prague
Peter G. Xuereb
Affiliation:
Malta
Bruno de Witte
Affiliation:
Florence
J.H.H. Weiler
Affiliation:
New York
W.H. Roobol
Affiliation:
Amsterdam
Jo Shaw
Affiliation:
Edinburgh and London
Ingolf Pernice
Affiliation:
Berlin
Miguel Poiares Maduro
Affiliation:
Luxembourg (in personal capacity)
Jean-Victor Louis
Affiliation:
Brussels
Rick Lawson
Affiliation:
Leiden
W.T. Eijsbouts
Affiliation:
Amsterdam/Florence
Deirdre Curtin
Affiliation:
Utrecht
Gráinne de Búrca
Affiliation:
Florence and NY
Arthur Benz
Affiliation:
Hagen (Germany)
Lars Michaelis
Affiliation:
Hagen (Germany)

Abstract

Following the dramatic No votes in the French and Dutch referendums on 29 May and 1 June 2005, a need was felt in the European constitutional law profession to react to the shock.

EuConst invited members of its Board and members of the European Constitutional Law Network to write a short comment about possible and possibly salutary effects of the events on the ways of European scholarship and teaching. Below are the reactions received. Authors are all members of ECLN and/or the Board of EuConst.

The contributions to this issue of EuConst by Jacques Ziller, Sacha Prechal and Herman van Gunsteren carry their comments on the events incorporated.

Type
Articles
Copyright
© Asser Press 2005

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