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On the Road to Universalism: A Comparative and Empirical Study of the UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 December 2011

Irit Mevorach
Affiliation:
Associate Professor, University of Nottingham.
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Abstract

The ability of the UNCITRAL Model Law on Cross-Border Insolvency to enhance unity in bankruptcy (i.e., universalism) has been doubted. Unlike the EC Regulation on Insolvency Proceedings, it does not provide rules on international jurisdiction and automatic recognition. Thus, both recognition of foreign proceedings and relief should be sought. The Model Law (like the EC Regulation) also lacks rules for corporate groups. For these reasons, commentators have predicted that countries implementing the Model Law will exploit the discretion and flexibility enshrined in this regime to protect local interest and will avoid maximum cooperation and deference to foreign jurisdictions. Nonetheless, this paper suggests that the Model Law has the potential of facilitating unified and centralised proceedings both for single and group companies. Moreover, the paper reports the results of a comparative empirical study (which investigated Model Law decisions) demonstrating that the Model Law is in fact on the road to universalism. Recognition under the Model Law has become something of a routine, group centralisations are being facilitated and a wide range of relief is being granted. The paper nevertheless points to the current shortcomings in the application of the Model Law and where it can be improved.

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Articles
Copyright
Copyright © T.M.C. Asser Press and the Authors 2011

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