Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 0.127 Render date: 2021-11-27T03:55:22.446Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

The European Company under French Law: Main Features

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2008

Get access

Abstract

The Regulation and the Directive on the Statute for a European company introduce a new corporate structure under French law justifying the inclusion of new chapters in both the Commercial Code and Labour Code of France. In order to assess the merits of this new alternative, the benefits offered by the SE structure and regime need to be examined in comparison with existing corporate structures under French law, in particular the SA, which is the structure that the SE most resembles. This article reviews the main features of the SE as a legal entity under French law facilitating the formation of European groups. It also looks at reasons for choosing the French SE regime from the point of view of corporate and employment law. The SE is clearly most valuable in cases where the scope of business is European, in which context it can facilitate transnational mergers and joint operations, make the transfer of registered offices possible and serve as a model for streamlining the corporate governance of European groups. If, on the whole, the French legislator has proved conservative with regard to the SE, even in implementing the Directive on labour side, he has nevertheless granted the ‘French’ SE plenty of freedom in the statutes regarding the definition of relationships among shareholders.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © T.M.C. Asser Press 2008

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The European Company under French Law: Main Features
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

The European Company under French Law: Main Features
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

The European Company under French Law: Main Features
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *