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The Value of Integration: A U.S. Perspective

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2012

Extract

The integration of humanitarian action into intervention operations, and particularly the inclusion of a military component, carries risks—but none so great as to be worth sacrificing integration on the altar of humanitarian purity. As in the case of Iraq in the first, emergency phase of an operation, humanitarian teams working closely with the combat troops can greatly reduce civilian suffering caused by shock, displacement, and lack of access to necessities of daily life. In the transition phase, as the military begins to turn over power to an independent political authority, integration of development teams is likewise important. Integration in the interest of humanity is no vice. Humanitarian exclusivity in the interest of purity is no virtue.

Type
Roundtable: Humanitarian Aid and Intervention: The Challenges of Integration
Copyright
Copyright © Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs 2004

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References

1 Members of the Independent Inquiry , “ Report of the Independent Inquiry into the Actions of the United Nations During the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda ,” S/1999/1257, December 15, 1999; available at http://www.un.org/Docs/journal/asp/ws.asp?m=S/1999/1257 .Google Scholar

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