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Effects of intra-articular hyaluronic acid on ex vivo responses by third carpal bone cartilage from horses with experimentally induced synovitis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2007

Jan L Palmer
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
Joseph Mansour
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA
Charles J Malemud*
Affiliation:
Department of Medicine and Department of Anatomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA Department of Medicine/Division of Rheumatic Diseases, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Foley Building Room 207, 2061 Cornell Road, Cleveland, OH 44106–5076, USA
Alicia L Bertone
Affiliation:
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Orthopaedic Research Laboratory, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA
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Abstract

We studied the extent to which intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) administered to horses with experimentally induced synovitis in the third middle carpal joint altered cartilage proteoglycans (PGs) and the biomechanical properties of the third carpal bone. Intra-articular HA (Hylartin-V®) was administered to the middle carpal joints of healthy horses before and after the induction of synovitis by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Two groups of horses received intra-articular HA only, with evaluation 2 and 6 weeks later (group 2 and group 4). Two other groups (group 1 and group 3) received LPS followed by intra-articular HA and evaluation 2 and 6 weeks later. Ex vivo third carpal bone cartilage PG synthesis was measured by 35SO4 incorporation and third carpal bone cartilage PG content was determined by an assay for glucuronic acid. Biomechanical properties were measured by indentation testing. At the 2-week evaluation, HA did not ablate the quantitative reduction in PG synthesis and PG content in animals with experimental synovitis. However, by 6 weeks, there was a significant rebound effect in that PG synthesis and PG content were elevated in horses with experimental synovitis that had received intra-articular HA, compared with horses that had received HA only for that period of time. There were also alterations in the gel filtration profiles of newly synthesized PGs on Sepharose CL-2B among the groups. However, there were no de novo PG species associated with any of the treatments. Furthermore, we found that the biomechanical properties of third carpal bone cartilage were not altered in any of the groups. These studies showed that intra-articular HA administered to horses with experimentally induced synovitis did not provide short-term (i.e. 2-week) benefit to third carpal bone cartilage PG synthesis. However, a long-term benefit of intra-articular HA may occur after the acute effects of synovitis on PG synthesis and PG content subside.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2004

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Effects of intra-articular hyaluronic acid on ex vivo responses by third carpal bone cartilage from horses with experimentally induced synovitis
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Effects of intra-articular hyaluronic acid on ex vivo responses by third carpal bone cartilage from horses with experimentally induced synovitis
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