Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-747cfc64b6-db5sh Total loading time: 0.162 Render date: 2021-06-17T08:16:42.705Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

CLOSED-MINDEDNESS AND DOGMATISM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 June 2018

Abstract

The primary goal of this paper is to propose a working analysis of the disposition of closed-mindedness. I argue that closed-mindedness (CM) is an unwillingness or inability to engage (seriously) with relevant intellectual options. Dogmatism (DG) is one kind of closed-mindedness: it is an unwillingness to engage seriously with relevant alternatives to the beliefs one already holds. I do not assume that the disposition of closed-mindedness is always an intellectual vice; rather I treat the analysis of the disposition, and its status as an intellectual vice, as separate questions. The concluding section develops a framework for determining the conditions under which closed-mindedness will be an intellectual vice.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2018 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Alfano, M. MS. ‘Virtues for Agents in Directed Social Networks.’ Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
Audi, R. 2018. ‘Intellectual Virtue, Knowledge, and Justification.’ In Battaly, H. (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Virtue Epistemology. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Baehr, J. 2010. ‘Epistemic Malevolence.’ In Battaly, H. (ed.), Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic, pp. 189213. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Baehr, J. 2011. The Inquiring Mind. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Battaly, H. (ed.) 2010. ‘Epistemic Self-Indulgence.’ In Virtue and Vice, Moral and Epistemic, pp. 215–35. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Battaly, H. 2014. ‘Varieties of Epistemic Vice.’ In Matheson, J. and Vitz, R. (eds), The Ethics of Belief, pp. 5176. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Battaly, H. 2016. ‘Epistemic Virtue and Vice: Reliabilism, Responsibilism, and Personalism.’ In Mi, C., Slote, M. and Sosa, E. (eds), Moral and Intellectual Virtues in Western and Chinese Philosophy, pp. 99120. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Battaly, H. 2017 a. ‘Testimonial Injustice, Epistemic Vice, and Vice Epistemology.’ In Kidd, I. J., Polhaus, G. and Medina, J. (eds), The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice, pp. 223–31. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Battaly, H. 2017 b. ‘Intellectual Perseverance.’ Journal of Moral Philosophy. doi: 10.1163/17455243-46810064.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Battaly, H. 2018. ‘Can Closed-mindedness be an Intellectual Virtue?Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements, 85.Google Scholar
Battaly, H. Forthcoming. ‘Closed-mindedness as an Intellectual Vice.’ In Kelp, C. and Greco, J. (eds), Virtue Theoretic Epistemology: New Methods and Approaches. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
BonJour, L. 1985. The Structure of Empirical Knowledge. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Callan, E. and Arena, D. 2009. ‘Indoctrination.’ In Siegel, H. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education, pp. 104–21. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cassam, Q. Forthcoming. Vices of the Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cassam, Q. 2016. ‘Vice Epistemology.’ The Monist, 99: 159–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fricker, M. 2007. Epistemic Injustice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hare, W. 1979. Open-mindedness and Education. Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press.Google Scholar
Kidd, I. J. 2018. ‘Epistemic Corruption and Education.’ Episteme. https://doi.org/10.1017/epi.2018.3.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lindsay, B. C. 2012. Murder State: California's Native American Genocide, 1846–1873. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lynch, M. 2004. True to Life. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Lynch, M. Forthcoming. ‘Epistemic Arrogance and the Value of Political Dissent.’ In Johnson, C. R. (ed.), Voicing Dissent: The Ethics and Epistemology of Making Disagreement Public. New York, NY: Taylor & Francis.Google Scholar
Medina, J. 2013. The Epistemology of Resistance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Orwell, G. 1949. 1984. New York, NY: Harcourt, Brace & Co.Google Scholar
Riggs, W. 2016. ‘Open-mindedness, Insight, and Understanding.’ In Baehr, J. (ed.), Intellectual Virtues and Education, pp. 1837. New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
Roberts, R. and Wood, W. J. 2007. Intellectual Virtues. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zagzebski, L. 1996. Virtues of the Mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
10
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

CLOSED-MINDEDNESS AND DOGMATISM
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

CLOSED-MINDEDNESS AND DOGMATISM
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

CLOSED-MINDEDNESS AND DOGMATISM
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *