Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-sqtrr Total loading time: 0.298 Render date: 2022-06-29T23:31:48.383Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

People centred mental health care. The interplay between the individual perspective and the broader health care context

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 March 2012

Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Presentations of the Editorials, June 2012
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

The three Editorials published in this issue of EPS examine the implications of recent mental health care developments emerging from the World Health Organization Policy Framework People-Centered Health Care (WHO, 2007), five years after its promulgation. The framework stated that health must be viewed in a broader context, with all stakeholders involved, as it is influenced by a complex interplay of physical, social, economic, cultural and environmental factors. The policy framework therefore re-established the core value of all people's health and well-being as the central goal of healthcare services. It also acknowledged the global challenges of: translating principles and goals, such as equity and fairness, into policies; developing health care programmes that are firmly grounded in ethical principles; ensuring quality of health care, patient safety and human dignity; safeguarding patients' rights and needs, recognising the key role of families, culture and society as broader psychosocial and cultural determinants of health; and upholding ethics related to medical practice, research and education (Cloninger & Cloninger, Reference Cloninger and Cloninger2011; Miles & Mezzich, Reference Miles and Mezzich2011).

Although the importance of these criteria might now seem obvious, the overall history of health care systems shows that this is a rather recent view. In fact, before this last development, three eras of health-care provision styles can be identified: the age of paternalism, the age of technological autonomy and the age of bureaucracy (Siegler, Reference Siegler1998; Alexander & Lantos, Reference Alexander and Lantos2006).

The age of paternalism characterized the early phases of medicine development and lasted until the 1960s. During this period, physicians had almost complete control over patient care, and patients placed all trust in their physicians. Patients did not question their physicians' skill levels, ethics or morals. Moreover, during this era, medicine focused mainly on alleviating symptoms, as opposed to taking care of meeting patients needs.

Subsequently, economic and scientific advances radically changed health care over the decades. This age of technological autonomy of medicine was characterized by great progress, including many advances in various specialised fields, in the understanding and treatment of disease. During that era, patients, moreover, started to increase their power and their demands for autonomy. The patient–doctor relationship was therefore based on considerations of patient rights and informed consent.

In the 1990s, services available and care levels provided began to be based on equations factoring in efficiency and cost containment needs. This age of bureaucracy led to the risk that the good of society overall, low staff morale and burn-out could prevail over individual patient needs (Lasalvia et al. Reference Lasalvia, Bonetto, Bertani, Bissoli, Cristofalo, Marrella, Ceccato, Cremonese, De Rossi, Lazzarotto, Marangon, Morandin, Zucchetto, Tansella and Ruggeri2009; Priebe & Reininghaus, Reference Priebe and Reininghaus2011). It also, however, yielded the benefits of greater service-provider monitoring and accountability. In any event, both patients' and physicians' decisional preferences became progressively conditioned by procedures set up by administrator and policy-maker constraints.

During the era of bureaucracy, the patient-centredness concept developed somewhat in parallel, and its theoretical and methodological basis have since been further clarified. The criteria of quality, safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency and equity were integrated into a multidimensional view of health care provision (Kenagy et al. Reference Kenagy, Berwick and Shore1999).

The specific area of mental health care has long been the ‘canary in the mine’ of the above-cited developments in the history of medicine. For example, subjective assessment of mentally ill patients was neglected for decades, in both clinical practice and research. This approach was due to the (prejudiced) consideration that by the very nature of their illness, these individuals are unable to understand their need for treatment and are consequently unable to make ‘good’ decisions about how to conduct their lives. Thus, for many years, the mental health-care system took a paternalistic stance by directly controlling the lives of people diagnosed with severe mental disorder. The only form of service user ‘involvement’ was that of remaining the passive recipient of decisions made by others.

The crucial role of patient involvement in the planning and evaluation of mental health care has come to the forefront over the last 20 years, especially in countries transforming their institutional service provision into community-oriented care models (Tansella & Thornicroft, Reference Tansella and Thornicroft2009).

Patients and relatives satisfaction has been receiving greater focus in the field of mental health service research and evaluation. For instance, in the United States, in accordance with ‘consumerism’ principles, satisfaction studies have been conducted on a large-scale basis since as far back as the early 1960s, both in medicine and in psychiatry. In Europe, interest in the satisfaction with services developed later, and reached widespread diffusion in psychiatry only in the late 1990s (Ruggeri, Reference Ruggeri, Thornicroft and Tansella2010).

For many years, however, service satisfaction assessments were generally conducted from a rather simplistic perspective, with patients affected by mental disorders being asked to judge the quality of their healthcare much like they might rate an airplane flight (in terms, e.g., of comfort, friendly service and ‘on-time’ schedules). Patients therefore judged their healthcare quality based on non-technical aspects, such as ‘soft skills’ related to how professionals interact with the patients (Kenagy et al. Reference Kenagy, Berwick and Shore1999). Given their difficulty in evaluating a given practitioner's level of technical skill or training, the service qualities mental health-care users could actually evaluate were limited. Yet, indeed because responses were considered to be biased, they were also not given their due.

More finely tuned and comprehensive measurements have since shown that higher patient satisfaction does lead to better health care outcomes, by fostering adherence to prescribed regimens and follow-up treatment (Ruggeri et al. Reference Ruggeri, Lasalvia, Bisoffi, Thornicroft, Vazquez-Barquero, Becker, Knapp, Knudsen, Schene and Tansella2003, Reference Ruggeri, Lasalvia, Salvi, Cristofalo, Bonetto and Tansella2007). Patient-centred care is thus now viewed as a mental health-care and general health-care priority More than from consumerism, in Europe this accomplishment derives from developments in social psychiatry, i.e., the increasingly recognized key requirements of multidimensional outcome assessment (i.e., assessing, besides symptoms and disability, several other domains, such as service satisfaction, self-rated needs for care, subjective quality of life and caregiver burden) and multiaxiality (i.e., assessing these domain outcomes from different perspectives) (Lasalvia & Ruggeri, Reference Lasalvia and Ruggeri2007; Puschner et al. Reference Puschner, Steffen, Völker, Spitzer, Gaebel, Janssen, Klein, Spiessl, Steinert, Grempler, Muche and Becker2011). When assessed concurrently with other dimensions, satisfaction with services gives a major contribution in the overall understanding of the outcome of care.

Evidence shows that a key advantage of patient-centred care is that it promotes patients' sense of responsibility for their own particular health status, and this approach increases the likelihood that patients will safeguard their health and make the necessary health-related lifestyle changes to do so.

The shift of focus from ‘person-centred care’ to ‘people-centred care’ proposed by the WHO in 2007 represented a further development, as it focused not only on the ‘patient level’ but also on ‘service level’ requirements (Thornicroft & Tansella, Reference Thornicroft and Tansella1999). Moreover, it extended this view more broadly to social welfare policies, helping to pinpoint and counteract the risks of healthcare bureaucratisation thereby.

Hence, towards the end of the first decade of the third millennium, the people-centred approach has placed the need for innovative, balanced and holistic approaches to health care at the very centre of the scene, by clearly stating the need to consider this approach an urgent matter for health systems worldwide (Patel et al. Reference Patel, Garrison, de Jesus, Minas, Prince and Saxena2008; Ng et al. Reference Ng, Murray, Levy and Venter2009). This view encompasses several principles of the patient-centred approach, but extends them much further, by recognizing that, before people become patients, they need to be informed and empowered in promoting and protecting their own health.

Per una salute mentale centrata sulle persone: la prospettiva dell'individuo e il contesto dei servizi sanitari

I tre Editoriali pubblicati in questo numero di EPS analizzano le implicazioni, per l'ambito della salute mentale, del Documento quadro ‘People-Centered Health Care’ prodotto dall'Organizzazione Mondiale della Sanità (WHO, 2007), a cinque anni dalla sua promulgazione. Tale Documento asserisce che occorre occuparsi del tema della salute coinvolgendo i diversi ‘stakeholders’ e tenendo conto dell'interazione complessa fra fattori fisici, sociali, economici, culturali ed ambientali, e sancisce come obiettivo ineludibile dell'assistenza sanitaria il benessere e la salute di tutti gli individui. Sancisce inoltre, quali sfide da porsi a livello globale, il tradurre, in politiche concrete, principi quali l'equità e l'uguaglianza; sviluppare programmi fortemente basati su principi etici; garantire la qualità dei servizi sanitari, la sicurezza, la dignità dell'individuo, la salvaguardia dei diritti e dei bisogni dei pazienti; il riconoscimento del ruolo delle famiglie, del contesto culturale e sociale, come fattori che intervengono in maniera determinante sulla salute; la promozione di un approccio etico nella pratica medica, nella ricerca e nella formazione (Cloninger & Cloninger, Reference Cloninger and Cloninger2011; Miles & Mezzich, Reference Miles and Mezzich2011).

Nonostante questi criteri possano sembrare in qualche modo ovvii, vale la pena ricordare che la storia delle modificazioni avvenute nell'ambito dei servizi sanitari nel corso dei secoli mostra che questo è un punto di vista che si è affermato in tempi relativamente recenti. Infatti, prima degli sviluppi sopracitati, nella storia dell'assistenza sanitaria sono individuabili tre diverse epoche: l'epoca del paternalismo; l'epoca dello sviluppo tecnologico, l'epoca della burocratizzazione (Siegler, 1998; Alexander & Lantos, Reference Alexander and Lantos2006).

L'epoca del paternalismo ha caratterizzato le prime fasi dello sviluppo della medicina ed è durata approssimativamente fino agli anni '60 del secolo scorso. In quest'epoca, i medici avevano un controllo pressoché totale sulle cure fornite ai pazienti, e i pazienti si affidavano completamente al volere dei medici, non mettendo in alcun modo in discussione le loro competenze e i loro principi etici o morali. Inoltre, durante quest'epoca, la medicina si focalizzava principalmente sull'obiettivo di alleviare i sintomi, e non sull'obiettivo più generale di prendere in considerazione i bisogni dei pazienti.

Negli anni successivi, mutamenti economici e scoperte scientifiche hanno cambiato radicalmente la medicina. L'epoca dello sviluppo tecnologico è stata caratterizzata da progressi che hanno riguardato molti ambiti sanitari e modificato a fondo le conoscenze sull'eziopatogenesi e sui trattamenti di molte malattie. In quell'epoca, i pazienti hanno progressivamente aumentato il loro potere e le loro richieste di autonomia e la relazione medico-paziente è diventata un processo centrato anche sui diritti dei pazienti e sul consenso informato.

Negli anni '90 del secolo scorso, l'organizzazione dei servizi sanitari ha iniziato ad essere progressivamente sempre più influenzata da considerazioni legate ad aspetti quali l'efficienza e la necessità del contenimento dei costi. Questa epoca della burocrazia ha comportato il rischio che l'attenzione verso tematiche legate all'utilizzo delle risorse economiche e le problematiche legate a fenomeni di demotivazione o addirittura burn-out dello staff finissero col prevalere sui bisogni dei pazienti (Lasalvia et al. Reference Lasalvia, Bonetto, Bertani, Bissoli, Cristofalo, Marrella, Ceccato, Cremonese, De Rossi, Lazzarotto, Marangon, Morandin, Zucchetto, Tansella and Ruggeri2009; Priebe & Reininghaus, Reference Priebe and Reininghaus2011). Durante quest'epoca – in cui è indubbio che le scelte decisionali sia dei pazienti sia dei professionisti siano state condizionate in maniera crescente da procedure decise dagli amministratori e legate a scelte politiche – hanno tuttavia cominciato ad affermarsi anche i principi virtuosi del monitoraggio e dell' ‘accountability’. Inoltre, durante questa epoca – in modo parallelo alle tendenze precedentemente illustrate – la concettualizzazione della medicina centrata sul paziente ha continuato ad affinarsi e si è assistito ad un importante processo di chiarificazione delle sue basi teoriche e metodologiche. I principi della qualita', della sicurezza, della rapidità, dell'efficacia nella pratica, dell'efficienza e dell'equità sono stati integrati in una visione multidimensionale degli obiettivi dell'assistenza sanitaria (Kenagy et al. Reference Kenagy, Berwick and Shore1999).

L'ambito della salute mentale è stato sempre un sensore estremamente rappresentativo degli sviluppi sopracitati nella storia della medicina. Ad esempio, il ruolo delle valutazioni soggettive da parte dei pazienti affetti da disturbi psichici è stato per decenni negletto, sia nella pratica clinica che nella ricerca, a causa del pregiudizio che faceva ritenere che le caratteristiche stesse della malattia mentale rendessero le persone affette inconsapevoli dei propri bisogni e, di conseguenza, incapaci di prendere decisioni sulla propria vita. A lungo ha prevalso una visione paternalistica, mirata al controllo diretto da parte di chi operava nell'ambito della salute mentale delle scelte di vita dei pazienti affetti da disturbi psichici gravi, e il paziente era visto come colui che passivamente doveva accettare le decisioni prese da altri.

Soltanto negli ultimi 20 anni è stato riconosciuto il ruolo cruciale del coinvolgimento dei pazienti nella pianificazione e nella valutazione dei trattamenti, in particolare in quei Paesi che sono passati da modelli di assistenza psichiatrica centrati sull'ospedale a modelli centrati sull'approccio di comunità (Tansella & Thornicroft, Reference Tansella and Thornicroft2009).

La valutazione della soddisfazione degli utenti ha suscitato crescente interesse nell'ambito della valutazione dei servizi di salute mentale. Tali studi sono stati condotti sul larga scala sin dal 1960 negli Stati Uniti, sia in ambito medico che psichiatrico, favoriti dalla visione del paziente come ‘consumer’. In Europa, l'interesse verso la soddisfazione per i servizi ricevuti si è sviluppato più tardivamente, e ha raggiunto un'ampia diffusione in psichiatria solo alla fine degli anni ‘90 (Ruggeri, Reference Ruggeri, Thornicroft and Tansella2010).

Per molto tempo, la misurazione della soddisfazione degli utenti è stata condotta con un approccio piuttosto semplicistico, in cui ai pazienti affetti da disturbi psichici veniva chiesto di valutare le cure ricevute come se si trattasse di esprimere la propria soddisfazione rispetto a un viaggio in aereo, in termini di confort, gentilezza nel servizio, puntualità. Questo tipo di approccio presupponeva la sola capacità del paziente di giudicare aspetti ‘non tecnici’, quali le modalità comportamentali più elementari messe in atto dai professionisti nell'interazione con il paziente (Kenagy et al. Reference Kenagy, Berwick and Shore1999). L'esclusione dalla valutazione di componenti maggiormente legate alla ‘sostanza’ dell'intervento e alle competenze del terapeuta limitava non poco l'impatto di tali valutazioni, e, anche per questo, le potenzialità di tali valutazioni sono state a lungo sottostimate.

Misurazioni più accurate ed inclusive della soddisfazione degli utenti riguardo aspetti rilevanti dell'assistenza ricevuta hanno mostrato che una maggiore soddisfazione era associata ad esiti migliori e favoriva una più elevata aderenza alle terapie e alla presa in carico (Ruggeri et al. Reference Ruggeri, Lasalvia, Bisoffi, Thornicroft, Vazquez-Barquero, Becker, Knapp, Knudsen, Schene and Tansella2003, Reference Ruggeri, Lasalvia, Salvi, Cristofalo, Bonetto and Tansella2007; Lasalvia et al. Reference Lasalvia, Bonetto, Tansella, Stefani and Ruggeri2008).

Che l'assistenza debba essere centrata sul paziente è oggi ritenuta una priorità ineludibile sia nell'ambito strettamente medico sia nell'ambito della salute mentale. In Europa, più che da una attenzione rivolta al paziente inteso come ‘consumer’, gli sviluppi sopracitati paiono essere derivati da successivi sviluppi nell'ambito della psichiatria sociale, e in modo particolare dall'individuazione di due requisiti-chiave della valutazione dell'esito: la multidimensionalità (che richiede di prendere in considerazione, oltre ai sintomi e alla disabilità, anche la soddisfazione, i bisogni di cura, la qualità della vita, il carico familiare) e la multiassialità (che evidenzia la necessità di valutare l'esito in base alle diverse prospettive degli attori in gioco) (Lasalvia & Ruggeri, Reference Lasalvia and Ruggeri2007; Puschner et al. Reference Puschner, Steffen, Völker, Spitzer, Gaebel, Janssen, Klein, Spiessl, Steinert, Grempler, Muche and Becker2011). Secondo tale approccio, la soddisfazione verso i servizi viene analizzata in relazione ai risultati ottenuti negli altri indicatori ed assume così una funzione di notevole rilievo nella comprensione dell'esito complessivo dei trattamenti.

Le evidenze presenti in letteratura dimostrano che uno dei vantaggi principali dell'approccio centrato sul paziente è che esso promuove il senso di responsabilità del paziente; questo favorisce la sua salvaguardia attiva del proprio stato di salute e l'adozione di stili di vita maggiormente salutari.

Il passaggio da una assistenza centrata sul paziente ad una assistenza centrata sulle persone proposta dall'OMS nel 2007 ha rappresentato un ulteriore sviluppo di quanto sopracitato, in quanto favorisce una focalizzazione non solo sul paziente, ma anche sui servizi (Thornicroft & Tansella, Reference Thornicroft and Tansella1999). Inoltre, tale approccio estende la propria visuale alle politiche sociali, contribuendo così ad identificare ed attenuare i rischi delle crescente burocratizzazione dell'assistenza sanitaria.

In conclusione, al termine della prima decade del terzo millennio, l'approccio centrato sulle persone ha avuto il merito di porre al centro della scena la necessità di un modello innovativo, equilibrato ed olistico di assistenza sanitaria, e di asserire che tale paradigma deve essere considerato una priorità nella sanità a livello globale (Ng et al. Reference Ng, Murray, Levy and Venter2009; Patel et al. Reference Patel, Garrison, de Jesus, Minas, Prince and Saxena2008). Inoltre, questo approccio include, ed estende, vari principi fondanti dell'approccio centrato sul paziente, ed asserisce che prima ancora che le persone diventino pazienti, esse hanno il diritto di essere informate e di ricevere strumenti che consentano loro di promuovere e proteggere la propria salute.

References

Alexander, GC, Lantos, JD (2006). The doctor–patient relationship in the post-managed care era. American Journal of Bioethics 6, 2932.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cloninger, CR, Cloninger, KM (2011). Development of instruments and evaluative procedures on contributors to illness and health. International Journal of Person Centered Medicine 1, 456459.Google ScholarPubMed
Kenagy, JW, Berwick, DM, Shore, MF (1999). Service quality in health care. Journal of the American Medical Association 281, 661665.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lasalvia, A, Ruggeri, M (2007). Assessing the outcome of community-based psychiatric care: building a feedback loop from ‘real world’ health services research into clinical practice. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Supplementum 437, 615.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lasalvia, A, Bonetto, C, Tansella, M, Stefani, B, Ruggeri, M (2008). Does staff-patient agreement on needs for care predict a better mental health outcome? A 4-year follow-up in a community service. Psychological Medicine 38, 123133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lasalvia, A, Bonetto, C, Bertani, M, Bissoli, S, Cristofalo, D, Marrella, G, Ceccato, E, Cremonese, C, De Rossi, M, Lazzarotto, L, Marangon, V, Morandin, I, Zucchetto, M, Tansella, M, Ruggeri, M (2009). Influence of perceived organisational factors on job burnout: survey of community mental health staff. British Journal of Psychiatry 195, 537544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Miles, A, Mezzich, J (2011). Advancing the global communication of scholarship and research for personalized healthcare. International Journal of Person Centered Medicine 1, 15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ng, PC, Murray, SS, Levy, S, Venter, JC (2009). An agenda for personalized medicine. Nature 461(7265), 724726.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Patel, V, Garrison, P, de Jesus, Mari, Minas, H, Prince, M, Saxena, S, and on behalf of the advisory group of the Movement for Global Mental Health ( 2008). The Lancet's series on global mental health: 1 year on. Lancet 372, 13541357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Priebe, S, Reininghaus, U (2011). Fired up, not burnt out – focusing on the rewards of working in psychiatry. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences 20, 303305.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Puschner, B, Steffen, S, Völker, KA, Spitzer, C, Gaebel, W, Janssen, B, Klein, HE, Spiessl, H, Steinert, T, Grempler, J, Muche, R and Becker, T (2011). Needs-oriented discharge planning for high utilisers of psychiatric services: multicentre randomised controlled trial. Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences 20, 181192.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruggeri, M (2010). Satisfaction with mental health services. In Mental Health Outcome Measures, 3rd edn (ed. Thornicroft, G. and Tansella, M.), pp. 99115. Royal College of Psychiatrists: London.Google Scholar
Ruggeri, M, Lasalvia, A, Bisoffi, G, Thornicroft, G, Vazquez-Barquero, JL, Becker, T, Knapp, M, Knudsen, HC, Schene, A, Tansella, M (2003). Satisfaction with mental health services among people with schizophrenia in five European sites: results from the Epsilon study. Schizophrenia Bulletin 29, 229245.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ruggeri, M, Lasalvia, A, Salvi, G, Cristofalo, D, Bonetto, C, Tansella, M (2007). Applications and usefulness of routine measurement of patients' satisfaction with community-based mental health care. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Supplementum 437, 5365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siegler, M (1998). The future of the doctor-patient relationship in a world of managed care. Medicina nei Secoli 10, 4156.Google Scholar
Tansella, M, Thornicroft, G (2009). Implementation science: understanding the translation of evidence into practice. British Journal of Psychiatry 195, 283285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Thornicroft, G, Tansella, M (1999). The Mental Health Matrix: A Manual to Improve Services. Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Health Organisation (2007). People-Centered Care: A Policy Framework. WHO, Western Pacific Region: Geneva.Google Scholar
You have Access
3
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

People centred mental health care. The interplay between the individual perspective and the broader health care context
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

People centred mental health care. The interplay between the individual perspective and the broader health care context
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

People centred mental health care. The interplay between the individual perspective and the broader health care context
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *