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The seasonal distribution of campylobacter infection in nine European countries and New Zealand

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2002

G. NYLEN
Affiliation:
European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, France PHLS, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC), Wales
F. DUNSTAN
Affiliation:
University of Wales, College of Medicine, Wales
S. R. PALMER
Affiliation:
PHLS, Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre (CDSC), Wales University of Wales, College of Medicine, Wales
Y. ANDERSSON
Affiliation:
Swedish Institute of Infectious Disease Control, Sweden
F. BAGER
Affiliation:
Danish Zoonosis Centre, Denmark
J. COWDEN
Affiliation:
Scottish Centre for Infection and Environmental Health, Scotland
G. FEIERL
Affiliation:
Hygiene-Institut der Univ. Graz, Austria
Y. GALLOWAY
Affiliation:
ESR, New Zealand
G. KAPPERUD
Affiliation:
National Institute of Public Health, Norway
F. MEGRAUD
Affiliation:
Université de Bordeaux, France
K. MOLBAK
Affiliation:
Statens Serum Institute, Denmark
L. R. PETERSEN
Affiliation:
Robert Koch Institute, Germany
P. RUUTU
Affiliation:
National Public Health Institute, Finland
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Abstract

In all temperate countries campylobacter infection in humans follows a striking seasonal pattern, but little attention has been given to exploring the epidemiological explanations. In order to better characterize the seasonal patterns, data from nine European countries and New Zealand have been examined. Several European countries with weekly data available showed remarkably consistent seasonal patterns from year to year, with peaks in week 22 in Wales, week 26 in Scotland, week 32 in Denmark, week 30 in Finland and week 33 in Sweden. In Europe, the seasonal peak was most prominent in Finland and least prominent in Scotland and Austria. In New Zealand the seasonality was less consistent since the peak was more prolonged. Possible explanations for the seasonal peaks are discussed. Research into the causes of campylobacter seasonality should help considerably in elucidating the sources of human infection.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
2002 Cambridge University Press
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