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Human parvovirus B19 infection within a family and risk for pregnant women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 May 2009

A. Azzi
Affiliation:
Institute of Microbiology, University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 48, 50134 Florence, Italy
M. Trotta
Affiliation:
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence
K. Zakrzewska
Affiliation:
Institute of Microbiology, University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 48, 50134 Florence, Italy
E. Balzer
Affiliation:
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence
P. G. Rogasi
Affiliation:
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence
A. Carocci
Affiliation:
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence
F. Leoncini
Affiliation:
Unit of Infectious Diseases, Careggi Hospital, Florence
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Summary

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During an outbreak of parvovirus B19 infection among four related families at least 70% of the household contacts, including a woman at the 33rd week of pregnancy, became infected. Twins were born at the 39th week of pregnancy, both with B19 infection. B19 DNA was detected in their sera by a nested PCR, anti-B19 IgM was detectable only by an immunofluorescence assay, and low levels of maternal anti-B19 IgG were demonstrable by an immunoenzymatic test in the serum of both children. All the haematological parameters were normal at birth and 6 months later, when B19 DNA and anti-B19 antibody were no longer detectable in serum samples. This observation emphasizes the high risk of B19 infection among household contacts and the possibility of a favourable outcome of the foetal infection, possibly related to infection late in the pregnancy.

Type
Short Paper
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

References

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