Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-qcsxw Total loading time: 0.42 Render date: 2022-08-17T23:31:42.065Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Differential antimicrobial susceptibility profiles between symptomatic and asymptomatic non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Vietnamese children

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 May 2020

Andrea Parisi
Affiliation:
Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Tu Le Thi Phuong
Affiliation:
The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Alison E. Mather
Affiliation:
Quadram Institute Bioscience, Norwich, UK
Thibaut Jombart
Affiliation:
The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK
Ha Thanh Tuyen
Affiliation:
The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Nguyen Phu Huong Lan
Affiliation:
The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Nguyen Hoang Thu Trang
Affiliation:
The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Juan Carrique-Mas
Affiliation:
The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, UK
James I. Campbell
Affiliation:
The Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, Oxford University, Oxford, UK
Kathryn Glass
Affiliation:
Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Martyn D. Kirk
Affiliation:
Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
Stephen Baker*
Affiliation:
Cambridge Institute of Therapeutic Immunology & Infectious Disease (CITIID), Cambridge Biomedical Campus, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
*
Author for correspondence: Stephen Baker, E-mail: sgb47@medschl.cam.ac.uk
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) serovars, sequences types and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles have specific associations with animal and human infections in Vietnam. Antimicrobial resistance may have an effect on the manifestation of human NTS infections, with isolates from asymptomatic individuals being more susceptible to antimicrobials than those associated with animals and human diarrhoea.

Type
Short Paper
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - SA
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the same Creative Commons licence is included and the original work is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

There are an estimated 93.8 million cases of Salmonella gastroenteritis globally each year resulting in 155 000 deaths [Reference Majowicz1]. Consequently, non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) infections represent an important public health issue and a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality. The resistance of Salmonella to most first-line antimicrobials has been increasing in recent decades, prompting the World Health Organization (WHO) to include them on the list of priority pathogens for which new antimicrobials are needed [2].

NTS can persist in infected individuals for several months or even years without inducing clinical symptoms [Reference Marzel3]. Although asymptomatic carriers are thought to be a key reservoir for NTS organisms in human populations, the epidemiology of asymptomatic infections is not well described. In this study, we aimed to describe the population structure of non-invasive symptomatic (diarrhoeal) and asymptomatic NTS infections in humans and animals and identify potential sources of antimicrobial-resistant NTS organisms in humans.

We combined data from three cross-sectional studies conducted in Vietnam: (i) The Vietnam Initiative on Zoonotic Infections (VIZIONs): community-based studies of zoonotic disease transmission; (ii) the aetiology of diarrhoea in provincial hospitals; and (iii) Vietnam Bacterial Resistance (VIBRE) [Reference Nhung4Reference Tu8]. Of 524 NTS stool isolates analysed, 113 (21.56%) came from asymptomatic individuals, 98 from individuals with diarrhoea and 313 (59.73%) from animals (chickens, ducks, pigs and rodents). Ethical approval for these studies was obtained from the Oxford Tropical Research Ethics Committee (OxTREC) and/or the Scientific and Ethics Committee of corresponding hospitals and health departments: VIZIONs (protocol 157/12); the aetiology of diarrhoea in provincial hospitals (protocol 0109); VIBRE (protocol 48/11) and. the Australian National University Human Research Ethics Committee (protocol 2018/229).

Bacterial culture and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) was performed as previously described [Reference Nhung4, Reference Thompson6Reference Tu8]. Antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined according to the 2014 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines against ampicillin (AMP), amikacin (AK), ceftazidime (CAZ), ceftriaxone (CTX), chloramphenicol (CHL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), gentamicin (GEN) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT). Resistance to clinically important agents for NTS was defined as resistance to one or more of the following: AMP, CTX, CIP, GEN, or SXT. Multi-drug resistance (MDR) was defined as non-susceptibility to ≥1 agent in ≥3 antimicrobial classes.

Chi-square tests were used to test for heterogeneity of STs, AMR profiles and ST-AMR profiles between human asymptomatic/diarrhoeal and animal isolates. To evaluate an association between antimicrobial resistance and the source of isolate, we estimated odds ratios (ORs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) using logistic regression; P values ≤0.05 were considered significant. To determine the distribution of unique and shared STs, AMR profiles and ST-AMR profiles, Venn diagrams and pie charts were constructed; analyses were performed using Stata software version 15 (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA).

We identified 74 STs comprising 40 serovars. Serovar Weltevreden (ST365 and 1500) was the most common serovar both in human asymptomatic and animal isolates, accounting for 28.3% (32/113) and 13.7% (43/313) isolates, respectively. The most common isolate from human diarrhoeal specimens was serovar Typhimurium (ST34, 19, 99, 313 and 1544) accounting for 38.8% (38/98) isolates. Of 63 STs identified in asymptomatic humans and animals, 12 were unique to humans, 24 were unique to animals and 27 were shared by both. Likewise of the 63 STs identified in human diarrhoeal samples and animals, 12 were unique to humans, 29 to animals and 22 were shared by both species.

The source of the isolate was a significant predictor of antimicrobial susceptibility. Organisms associated with diarrhoea in humans demonstrated the highest level of antimicrobial resistance, whereas NTS associated with asymptomatic infections were susceptible to the majority of tested agents (Table 1). Human diarrhoeal isolates were resistant to a mean of 1.85 antimicrobials (s.d. 1.93; range 0–8); human asymptomatic isolates to a mean of 0.64 agents (s.d. 1.11; range 0–5); and animal infections to a mean of 1.03 agents (s.d. 1.47, range 0–6). Organisms from asymptomatic infections were significantly less resistant to antimicrobials than those from animal infections (OR 0.63; 95% CI 0.4–0.98; P = 0.04). By contrast, isolates from human diarrhoea were significantly more resistant to antimicrobials than animal isolates (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.04–1.42; P = 0.012) and isolates from asymptomatic infections (OR 1.70; 95% CI 1.28–2.25; P < 0.001). Similarly, the source of the isolate was an important predictor of MDR with NTS diarrhoeal isolates being more likely to be MDR when compared to human asymptomatic (OR 2.88; 95% CI 1.94–4.28; P < 0.001) and animal isolates (OR 1.6; 95% CI 1.35–1.89; P < 0.001). Correspondingly, human asymptomatic isolates were less likely to be MDR when compared to animal isolates; however, this association was not statistically significant (OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.23–1.04; P = 0.062). Overall, we identified 45 unique antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. In comparing human asymptomatic isolates and animal isolates, three were unique to humans, 18 to animals and 16 were shared by both. In comparing human diarrheal isolates and animals, eight were unique to humans, 22 were unique to animals and 12 were shared.

Table 1. Prevalence of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles among NTS isolates in Vietnam

a Resistant to ampicillin, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and/or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

b Resistant to ≥1 agent in ≥ 3 antimicrobial categories including penicillins (ampicillin), aminoglycosides (gentamicin, amikacin), sulphonamides (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole), quinolones (ciprofloxacin), cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, ceftazidime) and phenicols (chloramphenicol).

Lastly, to investigate the potential role of animal reservoirs in AMR NTS infections in humans, we compared the 200 ST-AMR profiles identified across all NTS isolates. Among the 161 ST-AMR profiles associated with human asymptomatic infection and animals, 28 (17.4%) were unique to humans, 102 (63.4%) to animals and 31 (19.3%) were shared by both. Concerning the 175 profiles identified in organisms associated with human diarrhoea and animals, 42 (24.0%) were unique to humans, 111 (64.4%) to animals, but only 22 (12.6%) were shared by both (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1. Distribution of Salmonella sequence types and AMR profiles in animal and human Salmonella in Vietnam. The number and proportion of unique and shared ST-AMR profiles among asymptomatic human and animal NTS isolates (a,b) and diarrhoeal human and animal NTS isolates (c,d) in Vietnam.

Our data show that specific NTS serovars, STs and antimicrobial susceptibility phenotypes appear to have associations with animal and human infection. We identified a comparable population structure between NTS isolated from animals and asymptomatic human in Vietnam, highlighting the role of animal reservoirs in the disease transmission. However, a high prevalence of human asymptomatic NTS infections suggests that carriers may play a role in disease transmission. Furthermore, asymptomatic NTS organisms were less resistant to antimicrobials in comparison with human diarrhoeal isolates. This observation suggests that AMR may have a significant effect on disease manifestation and outcome [Reference Parisi9]. Lastly, due to the high infectious disease burden and inappropriate use of antimicrobials in humans and animal production in Vietnam [10], it is necessary to adopt principles of antimicrobial stewardship and conduct more studies examining the antimicrobial resistance in a One Health context.

Acknowledgements

We wish to acknowledge all members of the enteric infections group at Oxford University Clinical Research Unit (OUCRU) in Vietnam and Nepal and the study team at Patan Hospital. This work was supported by a Wellcome senior research fellowship to Stephen Baker to (215515/Z/19/Z).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no competing interests.

References

Majowicz, SE et al. (2010) The global burden of nontyphoidal Salmonella Gastroenteritis. Clinical Infectious Diseases 50, 882889.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
World Health Organization (2017) Global priority list of antibiotic-resistant bacteria to guide research, discovery, and development of new antibiotics. Available at https://www.who.int/medicines/publications/global-priority-list-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria/en/ May 2020].Google Scholar
Marzel, A et al. (2016) Persistent infections by Nontyphoidal Salmonella in humans: epidemiology and genetics. Clinical Infectious Diseases 62, 879886.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nhung, NT et al. (2015) High levels of antimicrobial resistance among Escherichia coli isolates from livestock farms and synanthropic rats and shrews in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 81, 812820.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rabaa, MA et al. (2015) The Vietnam Initiative on Zoonotic Infections (VIZIONS): a strategic approach to studying emerging zoonotic infectious diseases. EcoHealth 12, 726735.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thompson, CN et al. (2015) A prospective multi-center observational study of children hospitalized with diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 92, 10451052.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trung, NV et al. (2017) Non-Typhoidal Salmonella colonization in chickens and humans in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Zoonoses and Public Health 64, 9499.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tu, LT et al. (2015) High levels of contamination and antimicrobial-resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars on pig and poultry farms in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam. Epidemiology and Infection 143, 30743086.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parisi, A et al. (2018) Health outcomes from multidrug-resistant Salmonella infections in high-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease 15, 428436.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Global Antibiotic Resistance Partnership. Situation analysis: antibiotic use and resistance in Vietnam. Available at https://cddep.org/wpcontent/uploads/2017/06/vn_report_web_1_8.pdf May 2020.Google Scholar
Figure 0

Table 1. Prevalence of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles among NTS isolates in Vietnam

Figure 1

Fig. 1. Distribution of Salmonella sequence types and AMR profiles in animal and human Salmonella in Vietnam. The number and proportion of unique and shared ST-AMR profiles among asymptomatic human and animal NTS isolates (a,b) and diarrhoeal human and animal NTS isolates (c,d) in Vietnam.

You have Access Open access
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Differential antimicrobial susceptibility profiles between symptomatic and asymptomatic non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Vietnamese children
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Differential antimicrobial susceptibility profiles between symptomatic and asymptomatic non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Vietnamese children
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Differential antimicrobial susceptibility profiles between symptomatic and asymptomatic non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Vietnamese children
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *