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Application of choice experiments to quantify the existence value of an endemic moss: a case study in Chile

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2012

Claudia Cerda
Affiliation:
Department of Forest Resource Management, Faculty of Forestry and Conservation of Nature, University of Chile, Santa Rosa 11315, La Pintana, Santiago de Chile, Chile. Tel: + 56-2-9785903. Fax: + 56-2-5414952. E-mail: clcerdaj@uchile.cl
Jan Barkmann
Affiliation:
Institute of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, Environmental and Resource Economics, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. E-mail: jbarkma@gwdg.de
Rainer Marggraf
Affiliation:
Institute of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, Environmental and Resource Economics, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. E-mail: rmarggr@gwdg.de

Abstract

A choice experiment was applied to measure the existence value of an endemic moss. We assessed value separation, embedding or warm glow and ‘ethical’ motivations. We exemplify our application by valuing an inconspicuous moss endemic to Chile's sub-Antarctic region. The choice experiment was administered to a sample of local residents of Navarino Island (southern Chile). The design isolates the existence value by requiring respondents to make simultaneous tradeoffs between moss existence value, five other biodiversity-related values and income changes. Insensitivity to scope was addressed by using degrees of extinction risks. We predominantly use a willingness-to-accept design of the payment vehicle to avoid protest responses. A meaningful marginal value for the existence of an endemic species for Navarino island residents was documented. The design, based on varying degrees of extinction risk, avoided a strong effect of warm glow. No protest responses motivated by ethical concerns were encountered.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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