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English Plus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 October 2008

Abstract

The debate continues over whether the primacy of English should be enshrined in the U.S. constitution. Here, it takes the form of ‘language restrictionism’ versus ‘English plus at least one other language’ for every citizen who so chooses.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1988

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References

1Nationwide Debate Grows Over English Language Amendments,’ EPIC Events, Vol. I, No. 1 (03/04 1988).Google Scholar
2 Hearst Corp. Survey on the Constitution reported in ‘Survey: Most Think English is Official U.S. Language,’ Associated Press, 02 14, 1987.Google Scholar
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15Combs, Mary Carol and Trasvina, John, ‘Legal Implications of the English Language Amendment,’ The English Plus Project, League of United Latin American Citizens, June 1986.Google Scholar
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19Bennett, William, Speech, Association for a Better New York, New York City, September 26, 1985.Google Scholar
20 Spanish-American League Against Discrimination (SALAD) Education Committee, ‘Not English Only, English Plus!: Bilingual Education Issue Analysis,’ October 15, 1985.Google Scholar
21 Statement of Purpose, English Plus Information Clearinghouse, October 20, 1987.Google Scholar
22 Statement of Purpose, English Plus Information Clearinghouse, October 20, 1987.Google Scholar
23 Arizona English brochure, October 1987.Google Scholar
24 Brochure: ‘Conference on Language Rights and Public Policy: Perspectives on the English Only Movement’.Google Scholar
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