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QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF ANISOCOTYLY IN HABERLEA RHODOPENSIS AND RAMONDA MYCONI

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 June 2019

B.-H. Huang
Affiliation:
National Taiwan Normal University, 88 Ting-Chow Road, Section 4, Taipei 116, Taiwan.
K. Nishii
Affiliation:
Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, 20A Inverleith Row, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Scotland, UK. E-mail for correspondence: knishii@rbge.org.uk Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1293, Japan.
C.-N. Wang
Affiliation:
National Taiwan University, No. 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 10617, Taiwan.
M. Möller
Affiliation:
Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, 20A Inverleith Row, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Scotland, UK. E-mail for correspondence: knishii@rbge.org.uk
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Abstract

Anisocotyly, the unequal development of cotyledons post germination, is a unique trait observed only in Old World Gesneriaceae (Lamiales). New World Gesneriaceae have isocotylous seedlings. In both Old and New World Gesneriaceae, cotyledons initially grow equally for a short period just after germination. In the New World species, both cotyledons cease their growth at the same time early on, whereas in Old World species one cotyledon continues to expand to become a macrocotyledon while the other withers away. In this study, cotyledon growth was observed in two European Old World Gesneriaceae: Haberlea rhodopensis and Ramonda myconi. The results were compared with those for the typical anisocotylous species Streptocarpus rexii and the typical isocotylous species Corytoplectus speciosus. We found that the cotyledon growth patterns in Haberlea rhodopensis and Ramonda myconi were intermediate between the typical anisocotylous or isocotylous species. Haberlea rhodopensis and Ramonda myconi showed irregular growth patterns, with some plants being slightly anisocotylous but most being isocotylous. The developmental basis for the residual anisocotyly, the extended basal meristem activity in the macrocotyledon, appeared to be identical in the European species to that in the typical Old World Streptocarpus rexii but weakly expressed, rare and terminated early. In conclusion, European Gesneriaceae retain a reduced anisocotylous growth that may be linked to their early plumule development.

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© Trustees of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (2019) 

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Footnotes

*

Both authors have equally contributed to this work.

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QUANTITATIVE ASSESSMENT OF ANISOCOTYLY IN HABERLEA RHODOPENSIS AND RAMONDA MYCONI
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