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Inductive risk in macroeconomics: Natural Rate Theory, monetary policy, and the Great Canadian Slump

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 December 2020

Gabriele Contessa
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada
Corresponding

Abstract

This paper has two main goals. The first is to fill a gap in the literature on inductive risk by exploring the relevance of the notion of inductive risk to macroeconomics. The second is to draw some general lessons about inductive risk from the case discussed here. The most important of these lessons is that the notion of inductive risk is no less relevant to the relationship between the proximate and distal goals of policy than it is to the relationship between specific policies and their proximate goals.

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© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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