Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-zdfhw Total loading time: 0.263 Render date: 2022-08-14T04:09:48.220Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Fairness as Mutual Advantage? A Comment on Buchanan and Gauthier

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2008

Hans-Peter Weikard
Affiliation:
Universität Göttingen

Extract

The concept of fairness as mutual advantage has been developed in the tradition of social contract theory. In this framework society is seen as an enterprise that coordinates the activities of its members in order to advance their interests. All acceptable social rules are in the interest of each member of society. Rules are agreed unanimously – no rules can be enforced against the interest of someone. It is assumed that individuals are basically self-interested and rational. Radical libertarianism claims that individuals do not have to accept any a priori constraints on their behavior. “Libertarianism focuses on negative freedom” (Schokkaert, 1992, p. 89).

Type
Essays
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1994

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Binmore, Ken. 1991. Bargaining and Morality. CREST (Center for Research on Economic and Social Theory) Working Paper 17. Ann Arbor, : University of Michigan, Department of Economics.Google Scholar
Buchanan, James M. 1975. The Limits of Liberty: Between Anarchy and Leviathan. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Buchanan, James M. 1983. “Fairness, Hope, and Justice.” In New Directions in Economic justice, edited by Roger, Skurski. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press.Google Scholar
Gaertner, Wulf, and Marlies, Klemisch-Ahlert. 1991. “Gauthier's Approach to Distributive Justice and Other Bargaining Solutions.” In Contractarianism and Rational Choice: Essays on David Gauthier's Morals by Agreement, edited by Peter Vallentyne, , pp. 162–76. Cam-bridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Gauthier, David. 1986. Morals by Agreement. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Hubin, Donald C., and Mark, B. Lambeth. 1988. “Providing for Rights.” Dialogue 27. Reprinted in Contractarianism and Rational Choice: Essays on David Gauthier's Morals by 72 HANS-PETER WEIKARD Agreement, edited by Peter Vallentyne, , pp. 112–26. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Nash, John F. 1950. “The Bargaining Problem.” Econometrica 18:155–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nozick, Robert. 1974. Anarchy, State, and Utopia. Reprinted 1980. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
Rawls, John. 1971. A Theory of Justice. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Roemer, John E. 1986. “The Mismarriage of Bargaining Theory and Distributive Justice.” Ethics 97:88110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rubinstein, Ariel. 1982. “Perfect Equilibrium in a Bargaining Model.” Econometrica 50:207–11.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schokkaert, Eric. 1992. “The Economics of Distributive Justice, Welfare and Freedom.” In justice: Interdisciplinary Perspectives, edited by Scherer, Klaus R., pp. 65113Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Weikard, Hans-Peter. 1993. Interaction in Anarchy and the Social Contract: A Game-Theoretic Perspective. Discussion paper 9304. Institut fur Agrarokonomie, Universitat Gottingen.Google Scholar
2
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Fairness as Mutual Advantage? A Comment on Buchanan and Gauthier
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Fairness as Mutual Advantage? A Comment on Buchanan and Gauthier
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Fairness as Mutual Advantage? A Comment on Buchanan and Gauthier
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *