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An Artificial Boundary Condition for a Class of Quasi-Newtonian Stokes Flows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2015

Baoqing Liu*
Affiliation:
School of Applied Mathematics, Nanjing University of Finance and Economics, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Numerical Simulation of Large Scale Complex Systems, Nanjing 210023, China
Qing Chen
Affiliation:
School of Mathematical Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Numerical Simulation of Large Scale Complex Systems, Nanjing 210023, China
Qikui Du*
Affiliation:
School of Mathematical Sciences, Nanjing Normal University, Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory for Numerical Simulation of Large Scale Complex Systems, Nanjing 210023, China
*
Corresponding author. Email: lyberal@163.com
Corresponding author. Email: duqikui@njnu.edu.cn
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Abstract

An artificial boundary condition method, derived in terms of infinite Fourier series, is applied to solve a class of quasi-Newtonian Stokes flows. Based on the natural boundary reduction involving an artificial condition on the artificial boundary, the coupled variational problem and its numerical solution are obtained. The unique solvability of the continuous and discrete formulations are discussed, and the error analysis for the problem is also considered. Finally, an a posteriori error estimate for the corresponding problem is provided.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Global-Science Press 2014

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