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Using Participatory Action Research to Identify Strategies to Improve Pandemic Vaccination

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 June 2013

Kathleen A. Crowley
Affiliation:
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, USA
Ronnie Myers
Affiliation:
College of Dental Medicine, New York, New York, USA
Halley E.M. Riley
Affiliation:
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, USA
Stephen S. Morse
Affiliation:
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, New York, USA
Paul Brandt-Rauf
Affiliation:
School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois, USA
Robyn R.M. Gershon*
Affiliation:
Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California, USA
*
Correspondence: Robyn R.M. Gershon, MHS, DrPH, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 California St, Ste 280, San Francisco, CA 94118 (e-mail robyn.gershon@ucsf.edu)

Abstract

Objective

Developing and implementing effective strategies to increase influenza vaccination rates among health care personnel is an ongoing challenge, especially during a pandemic. We used participatory action research (PAR) methodology to identify targeted vaccination interventions that could potentially improve vaccine uptake in a medical center.

Methods

Front-line medical center personnel were recruited to participate in 2 PAR teams (clinical and nonclinical staff). Data from a recent medical center survey on barriers and facilitators to influenza (seasonal, pandemic, and combination) vaccine uptake were reviewed, and strategies to increase vaccination rates among medical center personnel were identified.

Results

Feasible, creative, and low-cost interventions were identified, including organizational strategies that differed from investigator-identified interventions. The recommended strategies also differed by team. The nonclinical team suggested programs focused on dispelling vaccination-related myths, and the clinical team suggested campaigns emphasizing the importance of vaccination to protect patients.

Conclusions

PAR methodology was useful to identify innovative and targeted recommendations for increasing vaccine uptake. By involving representative front-line workers, PAR may help medical centers improve influenza vaccination rates across all work groups. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;0:1–7)

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2013 

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