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Surge Capacity Concepts for Health Care Facilities: The CO-S-TR Model for Initial Incident Assessment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 April 2013

Abstract

Facility-based health care personnel often lack emergency management training and experience, making it a challenge to efficiently assess evolving incidents and rapidly mobilize appropriate resources. We propose the CO-S-TR model, a simple conceptual tool for hospital incident command personnel to prioritize initial incident actions to adequately address key components of surge capacity. There are 3 major categories in the tool, each with 4 subelements. “CO” stands for command, control, communications, and coordination and ensures that an incident management structure is implemented. “S” considers the logistical requirements for staff, stuff, space, and special (event-specific) considerations. “TR” comprises tracking, triage, treatment, and transportation: basic patient care and patient movement functions. This comprehensive yet simple approach is designed to be implemented in the immediate aftermath of an incident, and complements the incident command system by aiding effective incident assessment and surge capacity responses at the health care facility level. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2008;2(Suppl 1):S51–S57)

Type
Concepts in Disaster Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2008

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