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Research on Modularized Design and Allocation of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Equipment in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 November 2016

Xin Zhao
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China
Yun-dou Wang*
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China
Xiao-feng Zhang
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China
Shu-tian Gao
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China
Li-jun Guo
Affiliation:
Institute of Medical Equipment, Academy of Military Medical Sciences, Tianjin, China
Li-na Sun
Affiliation:
School of Foreign Languages, China University of Petroleum, Beijing, China.
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to Professor Yundou Wang, Institute of Medical Equipment, 106 Wandong Road, Tianjin, China 300171 (e-mail: 13312039963@126.com).

Abstract

For the prevention and control of newly emergent or sudden infectious diseases, we built an on-site, modularized prevention and control system and tested the equipment by using the clustering analysis method. On the basis of this system, we propose a modular equipment allocation method and 4 applications of this method for different types of infectious disease prevention and control. This will help to improve the efficiency and productivity of anti-epidemic emergency forces and will provide strong technical support for implementing more universal and serialized equipment in China. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:375–382)

Type
Concepts in Disaster Medicine
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2016 

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