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Reaction of Juntendo Shizuoka Hospital at Izu Peninsula to Typhoon Hagibis (2019) and an Analysis of Twitter Concerning Izunokuni City

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 September 2020

Kei Jitsuiki
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
Hiromichi Ohsaka
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
Jun Shitara
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
Motohiro Ishibashi
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
Megumi Suzuki
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
Yoko Nozawa
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
Youichi Yanagawa*
Affiliation:
Department of Acute Critical Care Medicine, Shizuoka Hospital, Juntendo University
*Corresponding
Correspondence to Dr. Youichi Yanagawa, 1129 Nagaoka, Izunokuni City, Shizuoka, Japan410-2295. Telephone: 055-948-3111. (e-mail: yyanaga@juntendo.ac.jp).

Abstract

Objective:

This research was carried out to report the activity of the headquarters for disaster control at our hospital, and investigate the usefulness of obtaining information from Twitter when Typhoon Hagibis hit Izu Peninsula.

Methods:

First, we recounted the activity of the headquarters for disaster control. We then collected information from Twitter from October 12-14, 2019, using the keyword Izunokuni.’ We took into consideration the contents of Twitter user posts as well as the number of reactions (‘retweets’ and ‘likes’). Twitter information was classified into photo (+) and (-) groups, depending on whether or not the post had a photo or video included. The number of reactions between the two groups was then analyzed.

Results:

We counted 122 Twitter posts containing Hagibis-related information for Izunokuni City. The average number of both ‘retweets’ and ‘likes’ in the photo (+) group were significantly greater than those in the photo (-) group. All photos and videos depicted specific places in Izunokuni City and included actual footage of disaster scenes or local warning signs.

Conclusion:

Based on our experience at the headquarters for disaster control during Typhoon Hagibis, Twitter was considered to be a useful tool for obtaining local disaster information based on its timeliness, reality and specificity.

Type
Original Research
Copyright
© 2020 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc.

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References

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Reaction of Juntendo Shizuoka Hospital at Izu Peninsula to Typhoon Hagibis (2019) and an Analysis of Twitter Concerning Izunokuni City
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