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Dynamic Changes in Clinical Characteristics During an Outbreak of Human Adenovirus Serotype 55 in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2016

Hong-Wei Gao
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Mao-Ti Wei
Affiliation:
The Logistics University of the Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China.
Hao-Jun Fan
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Hui Ding
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Wei Wei
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Zi-Quan Liu
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Yong-Zhong Zhang
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Qi Lv
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Wen-Long Dong
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Shi-Ke Hou
Affiliation:
Institute of Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Affiliated Hospital of Logistics University of Chinese People’s Armed Police Force (PAP), Tianjin, China The Key Laboratory of Emergency and Disaster Medicine in Chinese People’s Liberation Army (PLA), Tianjin, China
Corresponding
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Abstract

Objective

To determine dynamic changes in clinical characteristics by examining an outbreak of adenovirus infection that occurred from December 20, 2012, to February 25, 2013, in Tianjin, China.

Methods

Active surveillance for febrile respiratory illnesses was conducted, and medical records of patients were collected. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and sequencing were used for pathogen identification and viral genome study, respectively. Student’s t-test was used to compare the mean values of normally distributed continuous variables. Mann-Whitney U or Kruskal-Wallis tests were used if continuous variables were not normally distributed. Pearson’s chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test was used to compare categorical variables.

Results

The outbreak was sourced from the index case diagnosed as the common cold on December 20, 2012; a total of 856 cases were reported in the following 66 days. The pathogen was identified as human adenovirus (HAdV) 55. The symptoms manifested differently in severe and mild cases. Routine blood examinations, liver function indexes, and heart function indexes showed different dynamic patterns over time in hospitalized patients.

Conclusions

Clinical characteristics and laboratory examinations may reveal unique patterns over the course of HAdV-55 infection. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;12:464–469)

Type
Original Research
Copyright
Copyright © Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 2016 

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References

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