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Clarification of the Concept of Risk Communication and its Role in Public Health Crisis Management in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2019

Wuqi Qiu*
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health Strategy Research, Institute of Medical Information, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China
Cordia Chu
Affiliation:
Centre for Environment and Population Health, Griffith University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
*
Correspondence and reprint requests to: Wuqi Qiu, Department of Public Health Strategy Research, Institute of Medical Information, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 3 Yabao Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100020, China (e-mail: qiu.wuqi@imicams.ac.cn).

Abstract

Risk communication plays a very important role in the prevention of public health crisis events and has been considered by the World Health Organization (WHO) to be 1 of the main functions of an emergency public health crisis. However, it is a relatively new research field in China, so many people have mistaken understandings of risk communication. This article will describe the concept and importance of risk communication and briefly introduce the role of risk communication in public health crisis management. It also provides information for the prevention of public health crisis events in the future.

Type
Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Society for Disaster Medicine and Public Health, Inc. 

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